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Geography

College of Liberal Arts

CSULB students walk on campus

Geography - Courses

LOWER DIVISION

100. World Regional Geography (3)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: One G.E. Foundation course.
Through a spatial approach, World Regional Geography introduces students to the world's geographic realms and examines their cultural, population and political dynamics, resources and economic development, patterns of settlement and environmental elements.
Not open for credit to students with credit in GEOG 100W.

120. Geography of Human Diversity in the United States (3)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: One G.E. Foundation course.
Examines America’s Human Diversity from a geographic perspective focusing on the spatial distribution and organization of race/ethnicity and gender/sexuality groups across the U.S.’s rural and urban cultural landscapes while emphasizing the spatial politics of inclusion and exclusion.

140. Introduction to Physical Geography (3)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: One G.E. Foundation course.
Systematic study of the physical environment including human-environmental interaction, environmental hazards, and natural resources.
Satisfies the GE B.3 Physical Universe requirement. Not open for credit to students with credit in GEOG 150.

160. Introduction to Human Geography (3)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: One G.E. Foundation course.
Geographic aspects of culture, including the past and present social, political and economic factors that are related to human perception, organization and use of the environment.

200. Introduction to Research Methods for Geographers (3)

Introduction to the scientific method in geography, with an emphasis on basic quantitative and qualitative techniques and their applications.
Not open for credit to student with credit in first course in statistics. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory).

250. Early World Historical Geography (4)

Prerequisites: Open only to Integrated Teacher Education Program (ITEP) students.
Emergence and changing nature of urban life, cultural and technological diffusions, and variations in the intensity of contact and exchange among cultures and civilizations over time. Geographic and historical factors, such as location and place, human/environment interactions, migrations, and diffusion.
Same as HIST 250.

280. Introduction to Geospatial Techniques (3)

Introduction to geospatial techniques, which include geographic information science (GIS), cartography, global positioning systems (GPS), and remote sensing. Students will be introduced to the geographic concepts required for spatial analysis.
(3 hours lecture)

UPPER DIVISION

General Education Category A must be completed prior to taking any upper division course.

301I. The Urban Scene (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Exploration courses, and Upper Division standing.
Analysis of urban life-styles; land use and design; population trends; conflicts in the increasingly multicultural urban setting; housing and community development; suburban-central city relationships; human utilization of urban life spaces; opinions of landmark urbanists; and future trends.
Not open for credit to students with credit in SOC 419.

304. California (3)

California’s diverse natural and cultural environment with emphasis upon social and economic problems and the human response to environmental hazards.

306. United States and Canada (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Common social, economic and political interests of the major human use regions of the United States and Canada. Describes and interprets the culture patterns of each region in relation to the natural settings in which they have developed.

308I. Africa South of the Sahara (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of the G.E. Foundation, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Human and environmental settings of Africa South of Sahara and the ecological, cultural, demographic, economic settlement and political relationships that characterize them.

309I. The Middle East and North Africa (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of the G.E. Foundation, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Human and physical settings of the Middle East and North Africa and the cultural, economic, settlement, and political relationships that characterize them stressing those factors which underlie the region’s instability and global importance.

313I. Southeast Asia (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of the GE Foundation, one or more Exploration courses and upper division status.
Cross-cultural examination of the characteristics and problems found across Southeast Asia, specifically, environmental and cultural patterns, historical development of the spatial organization of society, demographic and other dynamics of social change, and issues of socio-economic and political development.
Letter grade only (A-F).

314I. South Asia (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of the GE Foundation, one or more Exploration courses and upper division status.
Cross-cultural examination of the various characteristics and problems found across the region of South Asia. Specific foci are environmental and cultural patterns, the historical development of the spatial organization of society, demographic and other dynamics of social change related to issues of socio-economic and political development.
Letter grade only (A-F).

315I. East Asia (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of the GE Foundation, one or more Exploration courses and upper division status.
Cross-cultural examination of the characteristics and problems found across East Asia, specifically, environmental and cultural patterns, historical development of the spatial organization of society, demographic and other dynamics of social change, andissues of socio-economic and political development.
Letter grade only (A-F).

316. Europe (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
The human and physical patterns of Europe. Current cultural conditions and environmental problems.

318. Russia and Its Neighbors (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Systematic and regional study of the physical, economic and cultural geography of the countries of the former Soviet Union.

319I. International Development (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of the G.E. Foundation, one Explorations course, upper-division standing.
Theoretical and practical analysis of social, political, and economic development and alternative developmental models. Contemporary and historical comparisons of how "developed" and "developing" areas of the world have confronted various economic, social, and political challenges.
Same course as I/ST 319I. Not open for credit to students with credit in I/ST 319I.

321. Geography of Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Examines Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean from a regional geographical perspective. Utilizing both historical and contemporary points of view, it identifies and interprets the distinguishing environmental, demographic, cultural, social, economic, and geopolitical characteristics of the region.
Not open to students who have taken GEOG 320I. Letter grade only (A-F).

322. Geography of South America (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Examines South American from a regional geographical perspective. Utilizing both historical and contemporary points of view, it identifies and interprets the distinguishing environmental, demographic, cultural, social, economic, and geopolitical characteristics of the region.
Not open for credit to students who have credit in GEOG 320I . Letter grade only (A-F).

326. Pacific Island Area (3)

Regional synthesis of the physical and cultural geography of Australia, New Zealand and the island groups of Oceania.

340. Environmental Geography (3)

Prerequisite: GEOG 140 or GEOL 280.
Examines interrelationships between society and land and water environments. Focuses is on critical analysis of contemporary environmental issues in American West, including both physical and human factors.
Letter grade only (A-F).

352. Geography of Travel and Tourism (3)

Historical and comtemporary spatial characteristics and dimensions of tourism activity. Tourism, destinations, travel patterns, environmental and economic impacts, and analysis of regional tourism patterns.

355I. International Environmental Issues (3)

Prerequisites: Completion of the GE Foundation, one Explorations course, and upper division standing.
Examines the deterioration, destruction, maintenance and restoration of environmental systems and resources. Identifies and analyzes major environmental problems that have international dimensions. Investigates ongoing and potential efforts to resolve them.
Same course as I/ST355I. Not open for credit to students with credit in I/ST 355I.

360. Human Geography (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 100, 120, or 160.
Introduces breadth of research across subfields of human geography through examination of various contemporary topics, such as migration, globalization, cultural landscapes, urbanization, politics, agricultural practices, and development.
Letter grade only (A-F).

366. Introduction to Urban Geography (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 100, 120, 160 or 360 or consent of instructor.
Examines cities and urban phenomena from geographical perspective. Introduces core theories, concepts and techniques that geographers have developed to explain the origin, growth, functions, and character of urban places especially in North America.
Letter grade only (A-F).

380. Map Interpretation and Analysis (3)

Interpretation and understanding of maps as graphic communication with emphasis on critical analysis, symbolization, scale, projection.
(Lecture, problems 3 hours)

381. Maps and Civilization (3)

Maps and Civilization examines the role maps play in different cultures. Drawing upon the disciplines of cartography, geography, history, art, and science, it explores maps in Western and non-Western cultures; conventional and alternative cartographies; and mapping activities of men and women.
Letter grade only (A-F).

400. Geographical Analysis (4)

Prerequisite: GEOG 200 or any introductory statistics course or consent of instructor.
Examination of advanced quantitative techniques employed by geographers in analysis of spatial phenomena. Topics covered include multivariate statistical methods as models for geographical analysis. Emphasis on the application of these techniques in geographical research, using statistical software.
(3 hours seminar and 2 hours laboratory).

402. Qualitative Geographic Analysis (4)

Prerequisite: GEOG 200, or consent of instructor.
Examines qualitative geographic methodologies and methods through the theoretical frameworks that geographers employ in their research. Introduces survey, interview, and focus group techniques, textual analysis, participant observation, and ethnography. Includes a hands-on research experience.
(4 hours discussion). Letter grade only (A-F).

419./519. Geographies of Development and Inequality (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 360, GEOG 3I9I, I/ST 319I or permission of the instructor.
This course provides critical perspectives on issues facing the theory and practice of development geography. It also analyzes the emergence of non-governmental organizations, social movements and other forms of civic life that promote culture- and context-specific models of development. (Undergraduates register in GEOG 419; graduates in GEOG 519.)
Letter grade only (A-F).

440./540. Land and Water Resources (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 140 and either GEOG 340 or 355I, or consent of instructor. (Undergraduates register in GEOG 440; graduates register in GEOG 540.)
Examines interrelationships between land and water as components of the human environment. Focus is on management, use and human impacts, with an emphasis on water resources.
(Lecture-discussion)

442. Biogeography (3)

Prerequisite: GEOG 140. A course in biology, ecology or Geography 340 is strongly recommended.
Theories and methods of mapping plant and animal distributions, spatial interaction of species with environmental limiting factors, and the human role in temporal and spatial variation of ecosystems.
(Lec-problems; field experience)

443. Watersheds: Processes and Management (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 140 or consent of instructor.
Basic principles of watershed hydrology, including hydrologic processes, runoff behavior, precipitation patterns and watershed models. Evaluation of water quality elements such as nonpoint source pollution. Laboratory and field exercises will include hydrologic data collection, processing and evaluation.
(3 hours Lecture, 2 hours Laboratory)

444. Climatology (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 140.
Descriptive and explanatory analysis of elements and controls of climate. Climates of world emphasis on California and North America.
(Lecture, problems 3 hours)

445. Palaeoclimatology (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 444 or consent of instructor.
Methods and theories used in reconstructing and dating climates of the past 2 million years, using such proxies as sediment sequences, packrat middens, ice cores, tree rings, corals, and documentary data. Causes of environmental change and human interactions are analyzed.
(Lecture 3 hours, lab activities 2 hours)

446. Land Use Planning (3)

Examines land use planning, issues and responses concerning land use; coastal zones; environmental resource management; urban growth; design and aesthetics; planning parameters for residences, parks, conservation areas, shopping centers, and industrial areas; urban and regional revitalization, and transportation.
Not open for credit to students with credit in U/ST 446

447. Landscape Restoration (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 140 or GEOL 280. GEOG 340 or 355 highly recommended. A course in ecology or biogeography recommended.
Explores philosophical, political, and ecological issues associated with restoring degraded landscapes. Analysis of theoretical works, scientific research, planning documents and case studies. Examines potential for restoring natural landscapes.
Letter grade only (A-F).

448./548. Environmental Assessment (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 140 or GEOL 102 or GEOL 280; recommended: ES P 200 or GEOG 340 or GEOG 355I; or consent of instructor.
Introduction to the policy framework and techniques for assessing impacts on various aspects of the biological and physical environment. The course is a survey of multiple topics involving various types of environmental assessment, including data collection, processing and evaluation.
(Undergraduates register in GEOG 448; graduates register in 548.) (3 hours lecture, activity)

452. Geography of the Global Economy (3)

Prerequisite: GEOG 360 highly recommended.
Examines globalization processes that create integration of world’s economic, political, and cultural systems, but operate unevenly across space and time. Focuses on impact on people and places around the world.
(Lecture, problems) Letter grade only (A-F).

455. People As Agents of Environmental Change (3)

Examines human impact on biophysical environment from long-term and global perspective. Explores regional and global implications of these changes on people and environments. Examines different theories for explaining major human forces that drive environmental change.
(Lecture 3 hours)

458./558. Hazards and Risk Management (3)

Prerequisites: One earth science course (GEOG 140 or GEOL 102 or 190 or consent of instructor) and one social science course (e.g., GEOG 100 or 160 or consent of instructor).
Broad overview of hazards and disasters, whether natural or technological, emphasizing the physical and social dynamics that interact to produce hazard, the spatial and temporal distributions of various hazards, and policy options for disaster preparation, loss reduction, and community resilience.

460. Population Geography (3)

Introduction to geographic study of population. Includes growth and distribution of world population; results of changing births, deaths, and migration; variations in population composition; related problems such as food supplies and environmental deterioration.

462. Feminist Geography (3)

Prerequisite: GEOG 360 or permission of instructor.
Introduction to feminist geography. Critically engage with international research on topics such as geographies of emotion, care and health; femininities and masculinities; feminist post-structural theories and philosophies; and feminist methodological approaches to geographical research.
Letter grade only (A-F).

465./565. Social Geography (3)

Prerequisite: GEOG 160 or consent of instructor.
The geographies of society, including various methodological and theoretical approaches to social geography. Topics may include socio-spatial inequality, crime, housing, religious systems, medical and health geography, feminist geography, the geography of sexuality, the geography of race, or poststructuralist geography.

467./567. Urban Geography: Metropolitan Problems (3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (Undergraduates register in GEOG 467; graduates register in GEOG 567.)
Geographic components of metropolitan problems and their solutions. Problems related to transportation systems, housing, evolution of ghettos, urban perception and behavioral patterns will be discussed in terms of theoretical and practically applied urban planning solutions.
(Lecture, problems 3 hrs)

468. World Cities/Cities of the World (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 100, 120 or 160. GEOG 360 and 366 highly recommended.
Comparative examination of major world cities within the context of their regional and national urban systems. Compares and contrasts cities of developed and developing worlds. Explores divergent urbanization patterns and world city development in major cultural realms.
Letter grade only (A-F).

470. Political Geography (3)

Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or consent of instructor.
Comparative study of the earth’s politically organized regions and related systems. Varied approaches are explored, such as power analysis, genetic analysis, and functional analysis of political units. Stresses political geographic concepts used in analyzing the viability of states and nations.
(Lecture, problems)

471. Geographic Information Science (GIS) For Health (3)

GEOG 200 or SOC 250 or equivalent.
An Introduction to the fundamentals of Geographic Information Science and systems (GIS) including concepts and skills in spatial reasoning and spatial thinking. Explores GIS in spatial query, problem analysis and decision support using health-related applications. Lecture/discussion and Laboratory (2 hours seminar, 2 hours computer laboratory)
Letter grade only (A-F). Same course as HCA 471.

473. Remote Sensing (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 200 or equivalent and GEOG 380 or consent of instructor.
Processing and interpretation of aerial photographs and digital satellite imagery. Topics include the electromagnetic spectrum, energy-matter interactions, sensor characteristics, and the acquisition, processing and interpretation of imagery for applications including the analysis of vegetation dynamics, surface hydrology and urban environments.
(Seminar 3 hours; Laboratory 2 hours). Letter grade only (A-F).

474. Introduction to Digital Image Processing (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 140 and 473 or consent of the instructor.
Provides a background to the principles and concepts of digital image processing and the extraction of information from digital satellite data with focus various enhancement and extraction techniques, specifically, within the visible and near-infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum.
(Seminar 3 hours; Laboratory 2 hours). Letter grade only (A-F).

475. Geographical Applications in Remote Sensing (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 140, 160, 473, and 474.
Focuses on remote sensing applications. Students will be introduced to sophisticated imagery and analysis techniques, as applied to weather and fire modeling, arid lands environmental problems, or the urban environment.
(Seminar 3 hours; Laboratory 2 hours). Letter grade only (A-F).

481. Geographic Information Science for Natural Sciences (4)

Prerequisites: Junior/Senior/Graduate standing; GEOG 140 or BIOL 153 or 211B or GEOL 102.
Introduces fundamentals of geographic information science and systems (GIS) to non-geography students, including concepts and skills in spatial reasoning and spatial thinking. Explores GIS in spatial query, problem analysis and decision support, using biologic, geologic, and ecologic applications.
(2 hours of seminar, 2 hours of computer laboratory)

482. Map Design for Presentation and GIS (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 200 or equivalent and 380 or consent of instructor.
Theory and techniques in the creation of thematic maps including design, generalization, and symbolization, with an emphasis on computer presentation methods.
(Seminar 3 hours, laboratory 2 hours).

484./584. Advanced Concepts in Presentation Cartography (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 140, 160, 473, AND 474. Prerequisites: GEOG 200 or equivalent; GEOG 380; and GEOG 482.
Advanced theory and techniques for presentation cartography including communication, visualization, terrain representation, animation, and color.
(Seminar 3 hours; Laboratory 2 hours). Letter grade only (A-F).

485./585. Principles of Geographic Information Science (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 200 or equivalent; GEOG 380 and GEOG 482.
Fundamental concepts and techniques of geographic information systems and science are introduced. Emphasizes spatial analyses to address spatial questions.
(Seminar 3 hours; Laboratory 2 hours). Letter grade only (A-F).

486. Field Methods in Landscape Analysis (4)

Prerequisite: GEOG 380 or consent of instructor.
Introduction to field techniques, including formulation of field plans, recording direct observation, field mapping, sampling techniques, interviewing, and organizing and evaluating data for presentation.
(Lecture-discussion 1 hour, supervised field work 6 hours)

487A. Applications of Geographic Information Science (GIS): Environment and Natural Resources (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 140; 485 or 585, 488 or 588 or consent of instructor.
Use of Geographic Information Systems and science for spatial query, problem analysis, spatial modeling and decision support in natural resource assessment. Students who possess a background in GIS are introduced to environmental applications. Emphasizes the use of raster GIS.
(3 hours Lecture, 2 hours Laboratory)

487B. Applications of Geographic Information Science (GIS): Urban and Economic (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 485 or 585, 488 or 588 or consent of instructor.
Builds on introductory knowledge of Geographic Information Systems, spatial analysis and spatial data and focuses on urban and economic applications and analyses.
(3 hoursLecture, 2 hours Laboratory)

488./588. Advanced Topics in Geographic Information Science (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 200 or equivalent; 380, 482, 485 or 585 or consent of instructor.
Advanced concepts in geographic information systems and techniques are introduced and their applications in geography and related disciplines explored.
(Seminar 3 hours; Laboratory 2 hours). Letter grade only (A-F).

492. Internship in Applied Geography (3)

Prerequisites: Geography major with upper division or graduate standing, prior geography coursework or equivalent recommended, and consent of instructor.
Community-based placement to enhance professional preparation in applied geography.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units; a second semester experience shall differ substantially from first semester experience. Undergraduates may elect Credit/No Credit or letter grading; letter grading only is required for graduate students. Student will work under faculty supervision.

494. Special Topics (1-3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Application of geographical concepts and methodology to selected contemporary problems.
Topics will be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units with consent of department chairperson. May not be credited toward the major in geography without written department consent in advance of enrollment.

497. Directed Studies (1-3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Individually directed studies of special problems in geography.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units with consent of department chairperson. May not be credited toward the major in geography without written department consent in advance of enrollment.

GRADUATE LEVEL

502. Qualitative Geographic Analysis (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 200, or consent of instructor.
Examines qualitative geographic methodologies and methods through the theoretical frameworks that geographers employ in their research. Introduces survey, interview, and focus group techniques, textual analysis, participant observation, and ethnography. Includes a hands-on research experience.
(4 hours discussion). Letter grade only (A-F).

519./419. Geographies of Development and Inequality (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 360, GEOG 3I9I, I/ST 319I or permission of the instructor
This course provides critical perspectives on issues facing the theory and practice of development geography. It also analyzes the emergence of non-governmental organizations, social movements and other forms of civic life that promote culture- and context-specific models of development.
Letter grade only (A-F).

540./440. Land and Water Resources (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 140 and either GEOG 340 or 355i, or consent of instructor. (Undergraduates register in GEOG 440; graduates register in GEOG 540.)
Examines interrelationships between land and water as components of the human environment. Focus is on management, use and human impacts, with an emphasis on water resources.
Letter grade only (A-F). (Lecture-discussion)

543. Watersheds: Processes and Management (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 140 or consent of instructor.
Basic principles of watershed hydrology, including hydrologic processes, runoff behavior, precipitation patterns and watershed models. Evaluation of water quality elements such as nonpoint source pollution. Laboratory and field exercises will include hydrologic data collection, processing and evaluation.
(3 hours Lecture, 2 hours Laboratory)

545. Palaeoclimatology (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 444 or consent of instructor.
Reconstructing and dating past climates, climate changes, and their environmental impacts, using such proxies as sediment sequences, packrat middens, ice cores, tree rings, corals, and documentary data.. Earth’s changing orbital parameters, internal forcing mechanisms, and human factors are analyzed.
(Lecture 3 hours, lab activities 2 hours)

548./448. Environmental Assessment (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 140 or GEOL 102 or GEOL 280; recommended: ES P 200 or GEOG 340 or GEOG 355i; or consent of instructor.
Introduction to the policy framework and techniques for assessing impacts on various aspects of the biological and physical environment. The course is a survey of multiple topics involving various types of environmental assessment, including data collection, processing and evaluation. (Undergraduates register in GEOG 448; graduates register in 548).
Letter grade only (A-F). (3 hours lecture, activity)

558./458. Hazards and Risk Management

Prerequisites: One earth science course (GEOG 140 or GEOL 102 or 190 or consent of instructor) and one social science course (e.g., GEOG 100 or 160 or consent of instructor).
Broad overview of hazards and disasters, whether natural or technological, emphasizing the physical and social dynamics that interact to produce hazard, the spatial and temporal distributions of various hazards, and policy options for disaster preparation, loss reduction, and community resilience.

565./465. Social Geography

Prerequisites: GEOG 160 or consent of instructor.
The geographies of society, including various methodological and theoretical approaches to social geography. Topics may include socio-spatial inequality, crime, housing, religious systems, medical and health geography, feminist geography, the geography of sexuality, the geography of race, or poststructuralist geography.

567./467. Urban Geography: Metropolitan Problems (3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (Undergraduates register in GEOG 467; graduates register in GEOG 567.)
Geographic components of metropolitan problems and their solutions. Problems related to transportation systems, housing, evolution of ghettos, urban perception and behavioral patterns will be discussed in terms of theoretical and practically applied urban planning solutions.
(Lecture, problems 3 hrs) Letter grade only (A-F).

575. Geographical Applications in Remote Sensing (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 140, 160, 473, and 474.
Focuses on remote sensing applications. Students will be introduced to sophisticated imagery and analysis techniques, as applied to weather and fire modeling, arid lands environmental problems, or the urban environment.
(Seminar 3 hours; Laboratory 2 hours). Letter grade only (A-F).

584./484. Advanced Concepts in Presentation Cartography (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 200 or equivalent; 380 and 482.
Advanced theory and techniques for presentation cartography including communication, visualization, terrain representation, animation, and color.
(Seminar 3 hours; Laboratory 2 hours). Letter grade only (A-F).

585./485. Principles of Geographic Information Science (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 200 or equivalent; 380 and 482.
Fundamental concepts and techniques of geographic information systems and science are introduced. Emphasizes spatial analyses to address spatial questions.
(Seminar 3 hours; Laboratory 2 hours). Letter grade only (A-F).

586. Field Methods in Landscape Analysis (4)

Prerequisite: GEOG 380 or consent of the instructor.
Introduction to field techniques, including formulation of field plans, recording direct observation, field mapping, sampling techniques, interviewing, and organzing and evaluating data for presentation.
(Seminar 1 hour; Field Work 6 hours). Letter grade only (A-F).

587A. Applications of Geographic Information Science (GIS): Environment and Natural Resources (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 140; 485 or 585, 488 or 588 or consent of instructor.
The use of Geographic Information Systems and science for spatial query, problem analysis, spatial modeling and decision support in natural resource assessment. Students who possess a background in GIS are introduced to environmental applications. Emphasizes the use of raster GIS.
(3 hours Lecture, 2 hours of Laboratory)

587B. Applications of Geographic Information Science (GIS): Urban and Economic (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 485 or 585, 488 or 588 or consent of instructor.
Builds on introductory knowledge of Geographic Information Systems, spatial analysis and spatial data and focuses on urban and economic applications and analyses.
(3 hours Lecture, 2 hours Computer Laboratory)

588./488. Advanced Topics in Geographic Information Science (4)

Prerequisites: GEOG 200 or equivalent; 380, 482, 485 or 585 or consent of the instructor.
Advanced concepts in geographic information systems and techniques are introduced and their applications in geography and related discipline explored.
(Seminar 3 hours; Laboratory 2 hours). Letter grade only (A-F).

596. Geographic Thought and Literature (3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Proseminar in the history of 20th century Anglophone geographic thought with emphasis on the theoretical and subdisciplinary perspectives current in the field today.
Letter grade only (A-F).

640. Seminar in Physical Geography (3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Physical/environmental issues and problems.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units with consent of departmental advisor. Letter grade only (A-F).

650. Seminar in Cultural Geography (3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Systematic investigation of human occupancy in its varied environmental and regional settings.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units with consent of department advisor. Letter grade only (A-F).

666. Seminar in Urban Geography (3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Geographic concepts and techniques of research applied to specific urban areas.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units with consent of department advisor. Letter grade only (A-F).

680. Seminar in Geospatial Science (3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Application of geographic concepts and methodology to selected cartographic, GIS, remote sensing, and spatial analytic problems.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units with consent of departmental advisor. Letter grade only (A-F).

696. Seminar in Geographical Research Methods (3)

Prerequisites: GEOG 596, graduate status in geography, and concent instructor.
Critical survey of contemporary methodologies available for framing research in geography, emphasizing the connection between research models, research questions, and the selection and limitations of particular methods, techniques, and data.
Letter grade only (A-F).

697. Directed Research (1-3)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Research in geography supervised on an individual basis.
Letter grade only (A-F).

698. Thesis (1-6)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Planning, preparation and completion of thesis for the master’s degree.