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English

College of Liberal Arts

Pete the Prospector Statue

English - Undergraduate ENGL Courses

Courses (ENGL)


To encourage clarity and uniformity in the reporting of scholarship, students in all English courses are expected to learn and use standard methods of citation and documentation. For literary and critical study, the standard format is the documentation system prescribed by the Modern Language Association, detailed in the MLA Handbook, and simplified in many beginning textbooks in literary study. At the instructor's discretion, other methods may be used in courses in composition, technical writing, literacy studies, and other classes required for the English Education option.

LOWER DIVISION


Please check the section on “Application Procedures and Admissions Requirements” of this Catalog for CSU system-wide writing proficiency requirements.

1. Writing Skills (3)
Prerequisite: Students who score 147 or below on the English Placement Test and who have not taken equivalent courses in another department are eligible for enrollment in this course.
Basic course in writing, offering intensive practice in every stage of the writing process. Writing strategies at the level of word, sentence, and paragraph. Methods for developing and organizing ideas in coherent essays. Conventional mechanics, spelling, and grammar.
Does not count toward graduation, but does count toward course load. Credit/No Credit grading only.

1E. Writing Skills (3)
Students who score 147 or below on the English Placement Test and who have not taken equivalent courses in another department, are eligible for enrollment in this course.
Basic course in writing, offering intensive practice in every stage of writing process. Writing strategies at the level of word, sentence and paragraph. Methods to develop and organize ideas in coherent essays. Conventional mechanics, spelling, and the grammar of standard written English.
Does not count toward graduation but does count toward course load. Credit/No Credit grading only.

 

1E. Writing Skills (3)
Students who score 147 or below on the English Placement Test and who have not taken equivalent courses in another department, are eligible for enrollment in this course.
Basic course in writing, offering intensive practice in every stage of writing process. Writing strategies at the level of word, sentence and paragraph. Methods to develop and organize ideas in coherent essays. Conventional mechanics, spelling, and the grammar of standard written English.
Does not count toward graduation but does count toward course load. Credit/No Credit grading only.

 

100. Composition (3)
Prerequisites: A recorded total score of 151 or above on the English Placement test, or credit in ENGL 1 (or its equivalent) or consent of the instructor.
Writing, revising, and editing non-fiction prose, with emphasis on exposition and argument. Critical reading strategies for research. Satisfies the baccalaureate degree requirement for one course in written composition in English.
Not open for credit to students with credit in ENGL 100W, ASAM 100, AFRS 100, CHLS 104. (CAN ENGL 2)

 

101. Composition (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 100.
Writing expository prose, with emphasis on the research paper.

 

102. Critical Reading and Writing (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 100 with a minimum grade of “C.”
Analytical reading and persuasive writing with emphasis on logic and argumentation.
Not open for credit to students with credit in ENGL 200.

 

180. Appreciation of Literature (3)
Prerequisite/Corequisite: One Foundation course.
Study of works representing the scope and variety of themes and types of imaginative literature.
Not applicable toward an English major. Not open for credit to students with credit in ENGL 184.

 

184. Composition and Literature (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 100.
Introduction to the major literary genres and to methods of critical expository writing, including methods of research and documentation.
Required of all English majors. Open to non-majors with consent of instructor.

 

204. Introduction to Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100; completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Practice in the basic elements of creative nonfiction, including description, dialog, and framing.

 

205. Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100; completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Practice in the basic elements of fiction writing: character sketch, plot development, description, dialog.

 

206. Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100; completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Theory and techniques of poetry. Practice in creative work, with group discussions and individual conferences.

 

250A,B. Survey of English Literature (4,4)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100; completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Representative selections from English writers to and since the late eighteenth century.
(CAN ENGL 8, 250A; CAN ENGL 10, 250B)

 

270A,B. Survey of American Literature (4,4)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100; completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Representative selections from American writers to and since about 1865.

 

283. Science Fiction (3)
The literature of science fiction, from Frankenstein and H.G. Wells to the present, emphasizing the relevance of science and technology to literary fantasy.

 

285. Detective Fiction and Film (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 100.
Designed to acquaint students with the variety of short stories, novels, and films available in the genre of detective fiction. These works, both on paper and on film, will be discussed using traditional literary analyses.

 

UPPER DIVISION


General Education Category A must be completed prior to taking any upper-division course except upper-division language courses where students meet formal prerequisites and/or competency equivalent for advanced study. Therefore, ENGL 100 or its equivalent is a prerequisite for all upper-division courses.

An asterisk (*) next to a course number means the course is acceptable for the M.A. degree. An "I" next to a course number means the course is acceptable for Interdisciplinary Credit in General Education.

300. Advanced Composition (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, and Upper Division standing.
Study and apply rhetorical strategies of invention, arrangement, and style to write expository, analytic, and argumentative prose; examine how evidence is produced and presented in genres from different academic disciplines, from civic and workplace literacy, and from popular media.

 

301A. English Proficiency (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Intermediate course in English usage with emphasis on building proficiency in oral and written language.
Enrollment limited to students needing language development beyond skills acquired in ENGL 100, as assessed by scores on the Writing Proficiency Exam. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units. Not applicable to credit in any degree program of the Department of English.

 

301B. English Proficiency (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100 or equivalent.
Intermediate course in English usage with emphasis on building proficiency in oral and written language.
Enrollment limited to students needing language development beyond skills acquired in ENGL 100, as assessed by scores on the Writing Proficiency Exam. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units. Not applicable to credit in any degree program of the Department of English.

 

309. Applied Composition: Explorations in Children’s Writing (4) F,S
Advanced composition course incorporating the study of the evolution of written discourse and emergence of rhetorical structures in the writing of pre-adolescents.
Includes a 40-hour tutorial/research component. Discussion/Laboratory.

 

310. Applied Composition (4)
Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or 184 or 317 or a baccalaureate degree.
Intensive practice in writing, correcting, and evaluating compositions, with specific reference to contemporary classroom situations and problems.
Includes a 30-hour tutorial component in which students work as composition tutors. Required for all English Education majors.

 

317. Technical Communication (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, upper-division standing, and a previous composition course, i.e., ENGL 100, 101, 102, 300, or equivalents.
Expository writing on technical subjects dealt with in industry, science, government, and the academy. Introduction to long and short forms including reports, proposals, manuals, and journal articles, emphasizing the longer formal paper or technical report.

 

318I. Theory of Fiction and Film (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Examination of narrative methods and conventions of American and British fiction and film; consideration of relationships between artistic structure of fiction and film; study of theoretical and practical approaches to fiction and film.
Same course as FEA 318I.

 

320. English Grammar (4)
Advanced study in the principles of English grammar.

 

327. Essentials of the English Language (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 100 or its equivalent.
Introduction to the essentials of English language study for credential candidates, including the history of the English language, key models of English grammar, and applied topics ranging from semantics and dialect study to current research in the teaching of English.
Same course as LING 327.

 

337. Technology in the English Classroom (3)
Focuses on issues in use of computer-based technologies in society; basic components and operations of computer-based technology; computer applications/programs and video tape/film for teaching problem-solving, critical thinking, writing, and literature.
Meets Title 5 computer-education requirements for the Single Subject, Clear Teaching Credential in English and the Multiple Subject, Clear Teaching Credential with English Concentration.

 

340. American Indian Literature (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Analysis of the written and oral literacy traditions developed by American Indians. Range of works studied: oral history, tales, myths, song, prayer, poetry, short story, and novel.
Same course as AIS 340. Not open for credit to students with credit in AIS 340.

 

359. Postcolonial Literature (3)
Prerequisite: Upper-division status.
Survey of English-language writers from former colonies of Great Britain who have made major contributions in all literary genres.

 

363. Shakespeare I (4)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100; completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Principal plays of Shakespeare.

 

372I. Comedy in the United States (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Study of the history of American history from beginnings to present. Focuses on literature, but also on American traditions of humor on stage, in film, in song, and in signs. Explores theories of comedy.

 

375. American Ethnic Writers (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100; completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Survey of American writers of various non-European ethnic backgrounds who have made major contributions in all literary genres.

 

380. Approaches to English Studies (4)
Prerequisite: ENGL 184 or equivalent.
Advanced course in English Studies covering research methods; approaches to literary, rhetorical, and pedagogical topics; critical and literary terminology; genre; and advanced skills in writing and analysis.
Note: English majors must consult with their advisors because this course should be taken by the first semester of the junior year.

 

382. Women and Literature (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of Foundation requirement.
Survey of literature by women authors writing in English, across a range of historical periods; examination of works in various genres that present the complexity of women’s lives and the challenges of female authorship; exploration of feminist critical approaches.
Same course as W/ST 382.

 

384. Principles of Literary Study (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 184.
Fundamental issues of literary study such as literary history; literary forms; themes and conventions; major critical approaches. Intense written practice in literary analysis.

 

385. The Short Story (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100; completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Short story as a literary genre, with emphasis on analysis of individual stories.

 

386. Poetry (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100; completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Poetry as a literary genre, with emphasis on analysis of individual poems.

 

*390. Studies in Contemporary Literature (3)
Reading and analysis of literary works, British and American, written since 1945.
Topics, themes, or limitations for each section will be announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units with different topics.

 

*398. Modern Drama (3)
Continental, English, and American drama from Ibsen to the present.

 

*404. Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 or consent of instructor.
Writing creative nonfiction with a detailed study of published models and with an emphasis on the creative process.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units.

 

*405. Creative Writing: Short Story (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 205 or consent of instructor.
Writing short stories, with a detailed study of published models and with emphasis on the creative process.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units.

 

*406. Creative Writing: Poetry (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 206 or consent of instructor.
Writing poetry, with a detailed study of published models and with emphasis on the creative process.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units.

 

*407. Creative Writing: Novel (3)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Writing long fiction, with a detailed study of published models and with emphasis on the creative process.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units.

 

*408. Writing the Screen Adaptation (3)
Prerequisite: FEA 303 or 304 with a ‘B’ or better, or ENGL 405 or 407 with a ‘B’ or better, or consent of the instructor.
Writing script adaptations, with a study of adaptation theory and successful adaptation models.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units. Same course as FEA 408.

 

410./510. Theories of Writing and Literacy (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 309 or 310 or consent of instructor.
Focuses on several cross-disciplinary theories of producing written discourse. Studies how writing is learned, taught, viewed by the public, and used in social and academic interchange.

 

411./511. Research Methods in Rhetoric and Composition (4)
Introduction to (inter)disciplinary research methods in Rhetoric and Composition. Focuses on methods that have been motivating research since 1985, including archival, case study, ethnographic, historiographic, and teacher research. Intensive practice in conducting and writing research for (inter)disciplinary and/or public audiences.

 

416. Technical Editing (4)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Introduction to editing of written technical and business communication formats such as manuals, brochures, booklets, and newsletters. Teaches competence in the principles of sentence-level clarity and style, of factual accuracy, and of document design and production in professional settings.

 

417. Proposal Writing (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Writing of proposals in their various forms as letters, memos, grant applications, etcetera.

 

418. Manual Writing (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of Foundation requirement.
Writing of original manuals of various types in technical and professional fields. Company publications will be studied as models.

 

419. Writing in Science, Social Science, and Technology (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Intensive practice in writing on topics in science and literature. Contemporary examples will be studied as models.

 

423./523. Semantics (3)
Study of meaning in language.
Same course as LING 423. Not open for credit to students with credit in LING 423

 

426./526. History of the English Language (3)
Development of the English language from its beginnings to the present day.
Same course as LING 426.

 

*431. Classical Background of English Literature (3)
Greek and Roman literature, in translation, in relation to English literature; the interrelations of classical literature with philosophy and art.

 

432. Arthurian Literature: Medieval to Modern (3)
Examination of the genesis, development, and popularity of stories about King Arthur and his knights from the earliest medieval texts to modern treatments of the legend.

 

435. Teaching Composition (3)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Intensive examination and study of composition teaching practices, research and evaluation in public schools, including community colleges.

 

436. Theories and Practices of Reading (3)
Intensive investigation of theories and practices of reading with attention to how experienced and inexperienced readers construct text.

 

437. Technology and Teaching Language Arts (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100 and 337 or consent of instructor.
Intended for practicing teachers. Methods of integrating computer-based technology in instruction of writing, reading, and literature. Assessment and implementation of technological resources in place at students’ school sites or other settings. Hybrid course with face-to-face and electronic class interaction.

 

441. Women Writers of the Harlem Renaissance (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100 and upper-division status or consent of instructor.
Explores literature and lives of women authors of American Harlem Renaissance Period of 1920s. Examines critical reception, relative obscurity, and current re-discovery of these writers. Utilizes theoretical essays, biographical narratives, historical documents, and media images. Same course as W/ST 441.

 

442. Sexing Chicana Literature (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL100 and upper-division status or consent of instructor.
Analyzes how Chicana authors explore race, class, and gender. Focuses on use of sexuality, particularly with regard to cultural and literary stereotypes vs. experience and aesthetic practice. Themes will include desire, identity, empowerment through “traditional” roles, and violence and the body.
Same course as W/ST 442.

 

444. Literature and Environment (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division status.
Literature that focuses on the relationship between humans and the environment. Emphasis on how environmental texts represent nature, raise awareness of ecological issues, and encourage social change. Service learning requirement connects environmental literature with activism and community involvement.

 

451./554. Medieval Literature of the British Isles (3)
Representative selections of Old and Middle English prose and poetry read for the most part in modern English, including Beowulf, the romance, medieval drama, Chaucer, and the ballad.

 

452./552. Literature of the Renaissance (1500-1603) (3)
Prose and poetry of Marlowe, Sidney, Raleigh, Spenser, and other predecessors and contemporaries of Shakespeare, noting the influence of Humanism and the emergence of literary identity.

 

453./553. Literature of the Late Renaissance (1603-1660) (3)
Poetry and prose (chiefly non-dramatic) of Milton, Bacon, Jonson, Donne and the ‘Metaphysicals,’ and their contemporaries.

 

455./555. English Literature of the Enlightenment (1660-1798) (3)
Prose and poetry (chiefly non-dramatic) of Swift, Dryden, Pope, Johnson, Boswell, and their contemporaries, with emphasis on major satires such as Gulliver’s Travels and The Rape of the Lock.

 

456./556. English Literature of the Romantic Period (1798-1832) (3)
Poetry and prose (chiefly non-dramatic) of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, and their contemporaries, emphasizing the modern Romantic spirit, theories of literary art, and the concept of the self.

 

458./558. English Poetry and Prose of the Victorian Age (1832-1900) (3)
Poetry and prose of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Carlyle, Mill, and others, emphasizing literary, social, and political issues, and religious controversies.

 

459./559. English Literature of the Twentieth Century (1900-Present) (3)
Prose and poetry of Shaw, Conrad, Yeats, Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, and others, emphasizing artistic experimentation and the development of modern value systems.

 

462./562. Chaucer (3)
Works of Geoffrey Chaucer in Middle English.

 

*463. Shakespeare II (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 363.
Advanced study of some of the plays of Shakespeare.

 

466./566. Irish Literature in English (3)
Major Irish authors from the Celtic Revival to the present. The literature will be placed in its historical and political contexts, paying particular attention to the relationship between politics and literature, the status of women, and questions of national identity.

 

467A,B./567A,B. The English Novel (3,3)
History and development of long prose fiction in the British Isles to and since 1832.

 

468./568. English Drama (3)
Readings from the history of English drama, excluding Shakespeare, including Marlowe, Jonson, and Restoration comedy.

 

*469. Critical Studies in Major English Writers (4)
Prerequisites: At least senior standing and 12 units of upper-division English (including ENGL 380).
Intensive study of one to three major English authors.
May be repeated to a maximum of 8 units with different authors, but no more than 4 units may be used to satisfy requirements for English major. Topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

 

470. American Ethnic Literatures (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 375 or consent of instructor.
Advanced course in the examination of issues in the field of American ethnic writing.

 

472./572. American Literature: 1820-1865 (3)
Intensive examination of the major authors and works, along with newly recovered texts, from the period that is often called the "American Renaissance."

 

473./573. American Literature: 1865-1918 (3)
In-depth exploration of leading developments in poetry, the novel, the short story, and non-fictional prose in the United States between the Civil War and World War I.

 

474./574. Twentieth-Century American Literature (3)
American literature from about 1914 to the present.

 

475./575. The American Short Story (3)
History and development of the short story and its criticism in the United States.

 

476A,B./576A,B. American Poetry (3,3)
History and development of poetry and its criticism in the United States to and since 1945.

 

477A,B./577A,B. The American Novel (3,3)
History and development of the novel and its criticism in the United States to and since the 1920s.

 

478./578. American Drama (3)
History and development of drama and its criticism in the United States.

 

*479. Critical Studies in Major American Writers (4)
Prerequisites: At least senior standing and 12 units of upper-division English (including ENGL 380). Intensive study of one to three major American authors. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 units with different authors, but no more than 4 units may be used to satisfy the requirements for the English major. Topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

 

481. Children’s Literature (3)
Survey of literature suitable for children.

 

482. Literature for Adolescents (4)
Prerequisite: One college course in literature.
Survey of literature suitable for adolescents. Includes a 20-hour field experience in which students work with local secondary school students as reading mentors.
Required of all English Education majors.

 

483. Women in the Early Modern Era (3)
Study of representations and realities of women’s lives, 1500-1800, from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. Critical methodology of history and literature; explores women’s experiences of law and economics; religion; education and culture; marriage, sex, and health; politics and revolution.

 

484./584. Contemporary Literary Theory (3)
Study of the principal theories of literature including structuralism, hermeneutics, theory of genre, and theory of criticism.

 

*488. Topics in Rhetoric and Writing Studies (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 100.
Intensive study of a special topic in the field of rhetoric, composition, and writing studies.
May be repeated to a maximum of 12 units with different topics in the same semester, but no more than 6 units may be applied to the English major. Topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

 

*489. Critical Studies in Major Topics in Literatures Written in English (4)
Intensive study of a major topic in literatures written in English.
May be repeated to a maximum of 8 units with different topics in different semesters, but no more than 4 units may be used to satisfy the requirements for the English major. Topics to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.

 

491. Applied Technical Writing (1-3)
Prerequisite: Admission to Certificate Program in Technical and Professional Communication.
Writing and editing technical reports and papers. Independent production of a report in a technical or scientific area under faculty supervision.
May be repeated to a maximum of 4 units.

 

492A-B. Internship Technical - Professional Writing and Editing (1-3)
Prerequisite: Admission to Certificate Program in Technical and Professional Communication.
At least 90 hours writing and editing with cooperating agencies and companies on- and off-campus under direction and with evaluation of faculty in consultation with supervisors of the participating agency or company.
May be repeated to a maximum of 4 units.

 

*496. California Writing Project (1-4)
Specifically designed for teachers, prospective teachers, school administrators, and writers. Successful practices in teaching writing; writing and responding to others’ writing; theory and research behind successful literacy training.
CSULB-South Basin Writing Project is an affiliate of both the California and National Writing Projects.

 

497. Directed Studies in Composition (3)
Prerequisite: One upper-division writing course in English or consent of instructor.
Theory and practice of writing and language instruction. Recommended for prospective K-12 and college-level teachers. On-site participation in an educational setting required as a basis for research project.

 

499. Directed Studies (1-3)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Independent study undertaken under supervision of a faculty member.
May be repeated to a maximum of 4 units. Not applicable toward the Master of Arts in English.