Welcome to Earl Burns Miller Japanese Garden  
 
 
   
 

History

 

Welcome to the Earl Burns Miller Japanese Garden.
We sincerely hope that you find the garden a tranquil,
enriching and enjoyable experience.

Situated on the campus of CSU Long Beach, our 1.3 acre Hill and Pond Japanese-style garden was built through a generous donation from Mrs. Loraine Miller Collins in honor of her late husband Earl Burns Miller. Following three years of planning, and in collaboration with the University, Mrs. Miller Collins selected University master plan landscape architect and longtime friend Edward R. Lovell, ASLA to create its design. Construction began in the summer of 1980 and it was dedicated in the spring of 1981.

Founded as an educational resource for the campus and community, the garden advances the university's ongoing interest in international education and student engagement. It serves as an outdoor classroom setting for the visual arts and sciences, as well as a site for student mentoring and peer-to-peer relationships through internships and docent positions.

The garden is a hybrid art form that combines typical elements of Japanese garden design within the context of its Southern California location, and the vision of its founder. Earl and Loraine Miller shared a passion for the outdoors, and gardening in particular. Their belief in the importance of education to self development and their health and wellness-centered philanthropy continues through the CSULB International House, the EBM Japanese Garden, Miller Children's Hospital and other projects supported by the Earl B. and Loraine H. Miller Foundation. To learn more about the garden and its history, take the virtual tour.

"I have a dream for this garden. When a person is tired, or anxious, or in a quest of beauty, may they enter and come forth refreshed to meet the problems of the day. There will be music of the wind through the pines, music from the waterfalls and the birds. There will be serenity as you walk around the lake, and joy, I hope, in the beauty of the reflections in that lake. There will be iris and azaleas in the Spring. Flowering magnolia in Summer. In the Fall, chrysanthemums and the gold of the liquid amber trees. There will be strength and solidity in the rocks and the wooden bridges. And, of course, there will be bamboo, a favorite wood of the Japanese because it is so useful and beautiful. There is an old proverb that says, 'Bamboo bends but never breaks.' It is my hope that as you leave your tour of the garden, you will find in your heart that proverb, and the day will be filled with joy." – Loraine Miller Collins