Information Literacy for K-16 Settings

 


 



Purpose of this Site:

Today's educators and K-12 students need to be information literate: to be able to locate, evaluate, use and share information. California State University notes several specific reasons for students to be information literate:

* So they can successfully navigate through proliferating information resources

* To improve their quality of education

* To learn additional tools to reinforce course content

* To enhance lifelong learning.

 

The American Association of School Librarians (AASL) has established information literacy standards for K-12 students, which are aligned with the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) information literacy competency standards for higher education. Thus, undergraduate students and teacher candidates need to learn the ACRL information literacy competencies in order to succeed in college, as well as design curriculum that insures that their own future K-12 students meet information literacy standards as defined by AASL.

 

California State University Long Beach has developed a series of learning experiences that help students and teachers incorporate information literacy into the library media program and collaborate with classroom teachers to infuse information literacy across the curriculum. Library Media Teacher Services Credential Program Coordinator Dr. Farmer and University Librarians John D'Amicantonio and Tiffini Travis developed this Web site to provide Web sites and other resources on information literacy and supportive lesson plans. All book titles are located at CSULB's library. The main part of the Web site is comprised of seven modules: an overview, followed by each of the Big6 research steps.

The "Big6ô" is copyright (c) (1987) Michael B. Eisenberg and Robert E. Berkowitz. For more information, visit: www.big6.com
The assignments section lists Web sites and print resources that offer lesson plans that incorporate information literacy skills. Transcripts from the seven-part video produced by KOCE reconstruct a class research project process.

 

Additionally, the KOCE broadcasting station, in partnership with Dr. Farmer and Orange County library media teachers, developed a seven-part videotape series on information literacy. Each video focuses on one step in the information literacy research process, using Dr. Eisenberg&Berkowitz's Big6model: the most well-known information literacy model used in K-12 settings. Using high schoolers to dramatize each step, each 10-minute episode shows how students work with teachers and library media teachers to conduct research effectively. The seventh episode dramatizes the teacher-librarian partnership in developing effective learning activities that incorporate information literacy. To play the video clips, use RealMedia Player. Together, the videos and Web presence enable students and teachers to explore the details of information literacy, and practice those skills in  self determined, meaningful ways.

 


Standards

INFORMATION LITERACY COMPETENCY STANDARDS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION

http://www.ala.org/acrl/ilcomstan.html

These standards apply to students in higher education.

The site details the standards, their indicators, and their role within lifelong learning.

 

INFORMATION LITERACY STANDARDS FOR STUDENT LEARNING

http://www.ala.org/aasl/ip_nine.html

These nine standard apply to K-12 students.
From Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning, by American Association of School Librarians and Association for Educational Communications and Technology. Copyright 1998 American Library Association and Association for Educational Communications and Technology. Reprinted by permission of the American Library Association.

 

INFORMATION LITERACY RESOURCE GUIDES FOR SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT

http://www.ala.org/aasl/resources/infolit.html

Well-organized and researched documents that help librarians work with teachers and families to insure that students learn and practice information skills.

 

TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS

http://www.iste.org/

The International Society for Technology in Education has developed technology standards and indicators for K-12, higher education, and educators.

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Overview

 

Information Literacy means essentially the ability to locate, evaluate, select, use, and share information effectively.

CSULB's Information Literacy Standards are found at: http://www.csulb.edu/library/guide/infocomp.html
Their online tutorial is found at: http://nike.cecs.csulb.edu/~surf/

  

21st century literacies shows several Generation X approaches: http://www.kn.sbc.com/wired/21stcent/information.html

Florida International University Libraries developed a selective bibliography on information literacy: http://www.fiu.edu/~library/ili/biblio.html


Another good bibliography of information literacy competencies with links to university programs, is found at: http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlissues/acrlinfolit/informationliteracy.htm

 

The Institute of Information Literacy focuses on implications for administrators and faculty.

http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlissues/acrlinfolit/professactivity/iil/welcome.htm

 
Wisconsinís model academic standards melds information and technology literacies throughout the curriculum, and benchmarks targeted performances at 4th, 8th, and 12th grades: http://www.waunakee.k12.wi.us/DPI_Standards/matrix.htm


The Kansas State Department of Education aligned its information literacy standards to the American Association of School Librariansí, and developed benchmark indicators for each standard: http://www.ksde.org/outcomes/libstd52001.pdf

 
Mankato (Minnesota) area schools developed grade-level targeted performance standards for information and technology skills:  http://www.isd77.k12.mn.us/resources/infocurr/benchmarks.pdf

 
School Librarian Peter Milbury evaluated and gathered information literacy and library skills resources for use in school settings: http://www.school-libraries.org/resources/literacy.html

Several models of the research process, which is a core element of information literacy. Several are defined and explained in an Eduscapes web site: http://eduscapes.com/info/models.htm

 

 
TRAILS (Tool for Real-time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills) is a federally-funded project to create a standards-based, free tool for LMSs and HS teachers to assess studentsí info lit skills: http://www.trails-9.org

The supplementary video on information literacy, developed by KOCE, uses the Big6 model: http://www.big6.com/

 

Regardless of the model used, or aspect of information literacy addressed, the most powerful instruction and learning occurs when the teacher and librarian collaborate, each bringing his/her own expertise to the table. As they work to design effective learning activities that meet student needs, they model the kind of cooperative learning that students should undertake themselves as lifelong learners.

 

Streamed Video Session

Videotape Transcript

 

 

                                                     Information Literacy Web Sites

NATIONAL FORUM ON INFORMATION LITERACY

http://www.infolit.org/

An international consortium of information literacy agencies and experts


DIRECTORY OF ONLINE RESOURCES ON INFORMATION LITERACY

http://bulldogs.tlu.edu/mdibble/doril/

A rich list of definitions, models, assessments, research, and tutorials


INFORMATION LITERACY ON THE WWW
http://www.fiu.edu/~library/ili/iliweb.html
Florida International University's metasite of information literacy links


DIRECTORY OF ONLINE RESOURCES FOR INFORMATION LITERACY
http://bulldogs.tlu.edu/mdibble/doril/
Texas Lutheran University's metasite of information literacy links

S.O.S FOR INFORMATION LITERACY
http://informationliteracy.org/default.php
A federally-funded clearinghouse of resources for teaching information literacy to children

ONLINE RESOURCES FOR SCHOOL LIBRARIANS

http://schoolibrary.org/res/

Strong list of Information Literacy and Library Skills Resources developed by Peter Milbury and others

 

CSU INFORMATION COMPETENCE

http://its.calstate.edu/academic_technology/projects/information_competency.shtml

Information Literacy initiatives developed by academic librarians and teaching faculty

 

REDWOOD RESEARCH HANDBOOK

http://redwood.org/

Online handbook, which may be used as a series of worksheets, designed by Lesley Farmer

 

INFORMATION COMPETENCY DEFINITIONS

http://fog.ccsf.cc.ca.us/~cfrancis/info_cmp.html

This site provides a definition of information competency and also walks the user through the steps one needs to become information competent.

 

USING THE INTERNET FOR RESEARCH

http://www.vts.intute.ac.uk/

Step-by-step process for planning a research project that incorporates the Internet

 

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN PARKSIDE LIBRARY

http://www.uwp.edu/departments/library/infolit/intro/

A person who is information literate knows how to use the library to locate information, but information literacy goes beyond knowing how to use the library's catalog or finding information in periodicals. Find out more at this site.


LIBRARY INSTRUCTION
http://www.libraryinstruction.com/
Information literacy articles, resources, and lesson plans


INFORMATION LITERACY TUTORIALS
http://www.lib.washington.edu/uwill/tutorial.html
Online tutorials compiled by the University of Washington

INFORMATION SKILLS RESOURCES ON THE INTERNET

http://www.iasl-slo.org/infoskills.html
International Association for School Librarianship metsite

INFORMATION LITERACY - USEFUL LINKS
http://www.teachers.ash.org.au/rblonline/informationliteracy/infolitlinks.htm
Sue Spence's metasite of information literacy links

 

INFORMATION LITERACY LINKS
http://www.caul.edu.au/info-literacy/links.html
Australian university librarians' links to information literacy

 

LIBRARY SPOT
http://www.libraryspot.com
Many links to reference sources as well as library skills and librarianship

 

 


STEP 1: TASK DEFINITION

 

a. Frame the query or assignment. What am I supposed to do? What problem am I trying to solve?

b.  Identify the information needed. What do I need to know? What kind of information should I gather?

This initial task is often overlooked, but is crucial for efficient research. As the process continues, this first step may need to be revisited in order to refine the information need.    Some ways to define the problem include: reading the assignment carefully, asking clarifying questions, and creating specific research questions. To help identify the information needed, one can list what is already known,and then what gaps in knowledge exist. A concept map is a graphic technique to organize informational needs.

 

Streamed Video Session

Videotape Transcript

 

Concept Mapping

These resources are also useful when organizing their information found (step 5).

 

IMPROVING NOTETAKING WITH MIND MAPS

http://www.peterussell.com/mindmaps/mindmap.html

This site uses "mind maps" to address notetaking skills. The mind maps help to focus on information and how "information relates to other information."

 
CONCEPT DRAWING
http://www.conceptdraw.com/en/products/mindmap/

INSPIRATION

http://www.inspiration.com/

This software program helps the user develop a concept map or web, which can be transformed into an outline. Clip art and flowchart symbols make the map more sophisticated. A version for younger students is called Kidspiration.

 

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS

http://www.graphic.org/

A solid list of different online tools, with examples, to graphically organize ideas.

 

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STEP 2: INFORMATION SEEKING STRATEGIES

 

a. Identify possible sources. Where am I likely to find the answer?

b.  Select the sources. Which source is best for answering the question or solving the problem?

By planning how to conduct the research, the student saves time and figures where to look for the information needed.

It is important to locate information from a variety of sources and assess specific information within individual resources. The purpose and nature of your research frames the strategy to use and the kind of sources to consult. Check the kind of sources based on the aspects of your topic. For instance, current information is likely to be found in periodicals and online databases. Geographical information is likely to be found in atlases and guidebooks. First hand information may be found in primary sources, including interviews. The best source answers the exact research question or problem at the appropriate depth and breadth.

 

Streamed Video Session

Videotape Transcript


Boolean Logic

Evaluating Internet Resources

 

Boolean Logic

BOOLEAN SEARCHING ON THE INTERNET

http://www.internettutorials.net/boolean.html

A primer on Boolean searching.

 

INTRODUCTION TO BOOLEAN LOGIC AND SEARCH ENGINES

http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/Guides/Internet/SearchEngines.html

Done at UC Berkeley ,this site gives the background for Boolean logic and then gives examples of how it can be used in search engines and database services.


BOOLEAN MACHINE
http://kathyschrock.net/rbs3k/boolean
Made by Kathy Schrock's son, this site provides a clean and simple interactive way to explain Boolean operations.


KEYWORD CHALLENGE
http://21cif.imsa.edu/tutorials/challenge/Q2Q/KeywordChallenge.swf
Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy developed an interactive key word assessment tutorial.

 

 

Evaluating Internet Resources (see also step 3)

 

EVALUATING THE QUALITY OF INFORMATION ON THE INTERNET

http://www.virtualchase.com/quality

This commercial site focuses on evaluation factors such as objectivity, timeliness, accuracy, and authority.

 

EVALUATING WEB RESOURCES

http://www.widener.edu/Academics/Libraries/Wolfgram_Memorial_Library/Evaluate_Web_Pages/659/

Done at Widener University this web page provides users with goals and teaching strategies for evaluating web sites.

 

EVALUATING WEB SITES: CRITERIA AND TOOLS

http://www.library.cornell.edu/okuref/research/webeval.html

Updated in July 2001 this site done at Cornell examines the critical analysis of web sites as well as looking at more generic ways to evaluate.

 

CHECKLIST TO EVALUATING WEB SITES

http://www.lib.umd.edu/UMCP/UES/webcheck.html

As the name implies, this site gives step by step characteristics to consider when evaluating web sites.

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STEP 3: LOCATION AND ACCESS

 

a. Locate the source. Where can I find it?

b.  Locate the information within the source? What information is within the source? How do I find it?

In the first sub-step, access tools such as catalogs and indexes are used. On the Internet, this process incorporates search engines and directories. Each source itself is arranged in some kind of order, be it alphabetical,topical, or chronological. The table of contents and index are used to extract specific information without having to read the entire volume. Online resources usually have a FIND function, which enables the user to type in a key worded locate the best part of the file.

 

Streamed Video Session

Videotape Transcript

script

Finding Information (General)

Finding Information in Books

Finding Information In Periodicals

Finding Information on the Internet

Finding Information through Interviews

Evaluating Internet Resources


Finding Information (General)

 

EVALUATION OF INFORMATION SOURCES

http://www.vuw.ac.nz/staff/alastair_smith/evaln/evaln.htm

Metasite of evaluation web sites


TUTORIALS AND GUIDES 

 http://www.library.arizona.edu/help/tutorials/

Many good guides for finding and evaluating information

 

Finding Information In Books

USING THE PARTS OF A BOOK (The Web Portal For Educators)

http://www.teach-nology.com/worksheets/research/book/basic/index.html

This site details the different parts of a book as well as a quiz for students to review.

 

USING AN INDEX FOR INFORMATION (The Web Portal For Educators)

http://www.teach-nology.com/worksheets/research/book/basket/1/

This site details the index of books and provides aquiz for students to review.

 

USING TABLE OF CONTENTS (The Web Portal For Educators)

http://www.teach-nology.com/worksheets/research/book/contents/

This site details the index of books and provides a quiz for students to review.

 

"SEE ALSO" CROSS REFERENCES (Allegro Times)

http://www.allegrotechindexing.com/news004.htm

This site provides a description of see also references.

 

Finding Information In Periodicals

 

FINDING JOURNAL AND MAGAZINE ARTICLES (Duke University)

http://www.lib.duke.edu/libguide/fi_journals.htm

Provides an illustrated view of the difference between magazines and journal articles. Provides 5-step method for finding journals and magazine articles.


FINDING ARTICLE INFORMATION IN PERIODICALS
http://bullpup.lib.unca.edu/library/lr/perinfo.html
distinguishes among different types of periodical sources

 

Finding Information On The Internet

FINDING INFORMATION ON THE NET: A TUTORIAL (UC Berkeley)

http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/Guides/Internet/FindInfo.html

This site offers general information about what the Internet is, how to find web sites, evaluation of web sites as well as citation information.

 

BARE BONES 101

http://www.sc.edu/beaufort/library/pages/bones/bones.shtml

Basic tutorial on searching the Web

 

SEARCH ENGINE SHOWDOWN

http://www.searchengineshowdown.com/

Comparisons and analyses of search engines

 

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY AT ALBANY LIBRARIES

http://library.albany.edu/usered/evalsup/main.html

Good guides on searching the Net.

 

SPIDER'S APPRENTICE

http://monash.com/spidap.html

Evaluates different search tools

Finding Information through Interviews

ORAL HISTORY TECHNIQUES AND PROCEDURES
http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/books/oral.htm
In-depth treatment about interviewing processes and supporting equipment

FOLKLIFE AND FIELDWORK
http://www.loc.gov/folklife/fieldwork/
An introduction to ethnographic field techniques by Peter Bartis. A publication of the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress

 

Evaluating Information (see also step 2 for Web evaluation)

HOW TO CRITICALLY ANALYZE SOURCES (Cornell University)

http://www.library.cornell.edu/okuref/research/skill26.htm

This site addresses issues such as author, intendedaudience, objective reasoning etc. to help determine whether an informationsource meets the needsof an assignment.

 

EVALUATING SOURCES OF INFORMATION

http://infodome.sdsu.edu/research/evaluate/evaluate.shtml

San Diego State University Library's megasite of evaluation tools for examining resources in different formats.

EVALUATION OF INFORMATION RESOURCES (Information Quality WWWVirtual Library)

http://www.vuw.ac.nz/~agsmith/evaln/evaln.htm

A collection of links which discuss evaluation of information sources both print and web.

 

CRITICAL EVALUATION OF INFORMATION (Kathy Schrock)

http://www.schrockguide.net/critical-evaluation.html

This site is designed for use with elementary and middle school students. It provides evaluation sheets for students to fill out while looking at all types of information sources.

 

CRITICAL EVALUATION OF RESOURCES (UC Berkeley)

http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/Guides/Evaluation.html

This site provides students with criteria for determining if the content of their research meets the needs of their assignment.

 

 

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STEP 4: USE OF INFORMATION

 

a. Comprehend the information: read, listen, view. How do  I "get at" the information?

b.  Extract the useful information? What part of the source is useful? How do I document my findings?

Start by skimming the source. What are the main ideas? What is the perspective? Is this useful for the specific task at hand? To help comprehend the information, some people photocopy and highlight important sections. Sometimes people copy an online source onto the first of a two-column word processing program, and make comments/reflections in the second column. Other ways to document the information include timelines, graphic organizers (see step 1), and spreadsheets.

 

Streamed Video Session

Videotape Transcript

 

Formatting a Bibliography

Note-taking

Timelines

 

Formatting a Bibliography

 

STYLE MANUALS & CITATION METHODS

http://www.csulb.edu/library/eref/vref/style.html

This site has links to a number of citation styles:APA, MLA, AMA, Turabian and Chicago.

 

COPYRIGHT (CSULB Library)

http://www.csulb.edu/library/eref/vref/copyright.html

This site has links to a wide variety of copyright related web pages. Some are specific to academic issues while others provide general treatment.


CITATION MACHINE
citationmachine.net/

 Thorough template for citing different types of formats

 

 

Note-Taking

TEACHING STUDENTS TO TAKE BETTER NOTES

http://www.unl.edu/gradstudies/gsapd/instructional/notetaking.shtml

This site done at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln takes students through a step by step process of notetaking.

 

NOTETAKING WITH IN-CLASS SKILLS

http://www.ucc.vt.edu/stdysk/notetake.html

This site provides a 13 step process to good notetaking.

 

CORNELL NOTE TAKING PROCESS

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~acskills/docs/cornell_note_taking.doc

A useful way to take reflective notes.

 

 

Timelines

TIMELINE MAKER
http://www.teach-nology.com/web_tools/materials/timelines/
Provides a variety of ways of developing timelines
 

TIMELINES TEACHING TOOL

http://www.education-world.com/a_lesson/lesson044.shtml

This web site provides information on how to teach students to use timelines as well as providing appropriate links to some good timelines.

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STEP 5: SYNTHESIS

 

a. Organize the information. What is the logical way to put the findings together?

b.  Present the information. What is the most effective way to share the findings?

Since many research projects incorporate findings from a variety of sources, a unifying method of linking data is needed. Some people use outlines; others use graphic organizers (see step one). A database can be constructed as well to identify different aspects of the issue being addressed. A major decision is choosing the format for sharing the research findings and analysis. While the teacher may define the project's parameters, the student still needs to think about several factors when producing the final product:

* audience (e.g., classmates, President)

* objective of the project (e.g., persuade, prove a hypothesis)

* type of information found (e.g., visual, statistical)

* sequence of findings (chronological, branching decisions, etc.)

Whatever the product, students need to comply with copyright laws and issues of intellectual property: giving credit where credit is due.

 

Streamed Video Session

Videotape Transcript

 

Project Production

Writing Process

Copyright

 

Project Production

EHOW

http://www.ehow.com/

15,000 how-to solutions by topic.

 

ORGANIZING INFORMATION (Kidport.com)

http://www.kidport.com/Grade4/TAL/G4-TAL-Ordering.htm

This site illustrates the concepts of organization for 4th grade level students. Provides lots of examples and can easily be incorporated into a lesson plan.

 

ELECTRIC TEACHER

http://www.electricteacher.com/

Examples of project-centered applications for both students and teachers.

 

QUIA

http://www.quia.com/

fun site for using and creating online activities and Web pages.

 

MICROSOFT

http://www.microsoft.com/education

Tutorials and lessons on using MS Office products.

 

THE CHALLENGE 2000 MULTIMEDIA PROJECT: BUILDING BEST PRACTICES IN PROJECT-BASED LEARNING WITH MULTIMEDIA

http://pblmm.k12.ca.us/index.html

Information about multimedia projects, curriculum, learning activities and examples designed by San Mateo teachers.

 

ONLINE TUTORIALS (Florida Gold Coast University)

http://www.fgcu.edu/support/office2000/ppt/

This site provides an online tutorial for creating Power Point presentations using Power Point 2000.

 

POWER POINT TUTORIAL (George Washington University Graduate School of Education)

http://www.gwu.edu/~teachme/sc/desc_pp.htm

A tutorial designed for faculty and students

 

VISUAL GUIDE

http://www.visualguide.com/products_powerpoint.htm

 

A BIT BETTER CORPORATION

http://www.bitbetter.com/powertips.htm and http://www.bitbetter.com/powerfaq.htm

Two Web sites that give tips and techniques for using Power Point.

 

HYPERSTUDIO

http://www.hyperstudio.com/

 

KIDPIX

http://www.kidpix.com/

These commercial software programs offer easy-to-use authoring tools geared to younger students.

 

FILAMENTALITY

http://www.kn.pacbell.com/wired/fil/

User-friendly guides on creating curriculum-based Web pages.

 

WELCOME TO FRONT PAGE 2000 (Digital Education Network)

http://www.actden.com/fp2000/java/

A teacher friendly tutorial on how to use Microsoft's FrontPage to create class web sites. Designed to be easy to use and fun.

 

WEBQUEST PAGE

http://www.webquest.org

Describes and provides resources for developing WebQuests: an inquiry-based activity using Internet resources.

 

MT.EDGECUMBE HIGH SCHOOL DIGITAL LEARNER PORTFOLIOS

http://www.mehs.educ.state.ak.us/portfolios/portfolio.html

Helen Barrett is the leader in e-portfolio development and assessment

 

EDUCATION RESOURCE INFORMATION CENTER

http://www.askeric.org/cgi-bin/print.cgi/Resources/Educational_Technology /Multimedia_Education.html

ERIC's online bibliography of online resources on multimedia education

 

 

Writing Process Web Sites

THE WRITE SOURCE

http://thewritesource.com/index2.htm

The site includes links to writing topics, researchsites, MLA and APA style manuals, and Publish It!, a site where materia can be submitted for online publication.

 

GUIDE FOR WRITING RESEARCH PAPERS

http://wwwold.ccc.commnet.edu/mla/

Very helpful guidelines, well organized and easy touse; based on Modern Language Association (MLA) (Library Capital Community-Technical College, Hartford, CT)

 

PURDUE UNIVERSITY ONLINE WRITING LAW (OWL)

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/

"OWL offers ... Handouts for students and teachers about general writing processes, English as a Second Language, grammar, research and documenting sources, professional writing, and writing across the curriculum incorporating writing into a variety of disciplines.

 

SCOTT, FORESMAN HANDBOOK FOR WRITERS

http://occ.awlonline.com/bookbind/pubbooks/hairston_awl/chapter1/deluxe.html

This page, from the publisher, Scott, Foresman, has links to information about writing of all types. It includes model research projects, a research guide, links to other sites on research and writing, a citation manager and exercises for practice.

 

ONLINE RESOURCES FOR WRITERS

http://www.umaine.edu/wcenter/

A set of links to grammar, writing, dictionary, thesaurus, foreign language dictionary, citation format, ESL, and composition and rhetoric resources. (Univ. of Maine)

 

TECHNICAL WRITING

http://www.orangeusd.k12.ca.us/yorba/technical_writing.htm

Step-by-step information

 

 

 

Copyright

CYBERCRIME

http://www.cybercrime.gov/

Computer crime and intellectual property section of the Criminal Division of the U. S. Department of Justice

 

FAIR USE

http://fairuse.stanford.edu/

Links to a rich variety of information about copyright issues.

 

COPYRIGHT CRASH COURSE

http://www.lib.utsystem.edu/copyright/

Good interactive FAQ about specific issues.

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STEP 6: EVALUATION

 

a. Complete the task. Did I answer the question? Did I solve the problem? Did I do the assignment fully?

b.  Assess the process and the product. How could I improve?

This is probably the most important step, and should be done throughout the process so changes can be made to optimize the end result. A good way to proceed is to review each research step, and determine how successful each effort was -- and the reason for that. Many institutions use rubrics to help identify those indicators of success. status. It is also very helpful to get feedback from peers and instructors.

 

Streamed Video Session

Videotape Transcript

 

 

Assessment

 

KATHY SCHROCK'S GUIDE FOR EDUCATORS: ASSESSMENT AND RUBRIC INFORMATION

http://www.schrockguide.net/assessment-and-rubrics.html

Web page rubrics, general rubrics, articles, portfolios, report cards

 

NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY ASSESSMENT PAGE

http://pt3.nmsu.edu/links/assess.html

Bibliography of assessment and rubric tools, many of which are linked to standards

 

THE ALASKA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION & EARLY DEVELOPMENT'S CURRICULUM FRAMEWORKS PROJECT

http://www.eed.state.ak.us/TLS/FRAMEWORKS/content.htm

Within each curriculum area exists good lists of assessment tools and strategies

 

NORTHWEST REGIONAL EDUCATIONAL LABORATORY ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

http://www.nwrel.org/assessment/

Emphasis on language arts assessment

 

MIDLINK MAGAZINE'S RUBRICS AND HANDOUTS

http://www.ncsu.edu/midlink/ho.html

Project-specific rubrics for K-12 settings and rubrics templates

 

INTEGRATED PROBLEM SOLVING MODEL: RUBRIC FOR ASSESSMENT

http://www.big6.com/showarticle.php?id=39

Process /product rubric for use with students

 

PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT

http://electronicportfolios.com/

Includes information on the phases of portfolio development, different types of portfolios, and characteristics of effective portfolios

 

INTERNET RESOURCES FOR HIGHER EDUCATION OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT

http://www2.acs.ncsu.edu/UPA/assmt/resource.htm

Extensive list of Internet assessment resources managed by the North Carolina State Office of University Planning and Analysis

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WEB-BASED LESSON PLANS

The following Web sites model good lesson plans that incorporate information literacy:

 

BEST PRACTICES FOR LIBRARY ASSIGNMENTS

http://www.csulb.edu/~ttravis/GESI

CSULB Librarian Tiffini Travis provides pointers toinstructors on instructional design that incorporates information literacy,plagiarism issues and assessment.

 

NORTH CENTRAL REGIONAL EDUCATION LABORATORY LESSON

http://www.ncrtec.org/tl/lp/

This Web site is intended to help teachers write focused lesson plans. The Planner addresses essential questions that are often overlooked when planning curriculum units. Teachers bring their own content and are guided through each section by answering specific questions. The result is a comprehensive lesson plan aligned with standards that addresses assessment, content, teaching strategies and use of technology.

 

SCHOOLS OF CALIFORNIA ONLINE RESOURCES FOR EDUCATION

http://www.score.k12.ca.us/

Lesson plans, tutorials and reference tools for K-12 teachers and students in mathematics, science, language arts and social studies.

 
NTeQ INTEGRATING COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY INTO THE CLASSROOM

http://www.nteq.com/examples/webex.html

Rich collection of technology-infused lessons using the NTeQ template

GATEWAY TO EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS

http://www.thegateway.org/

One-step access to lessons, curriculum units and other educational resources.

 

LESSON PLANS AND TEACHING ACTIVITIES FOR SCHOOL LIBRARIANS

http://www.libraries.phila.k12.pa.us/lion/lessons.html

Lessons designed by Philadelphia school librarians.

 

K12 DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP

http://k12digitalcitizenship.wikispaces.com

The resources section links to lessons that focus on digital citizenship, including information literacy; there are also sample lessons and workshops targeted to different members of the school community

 

R*TEC LESSONS

http://4teachers.org/intech/lessons/

A searchable database of technology-rich lesson plans; this site also includes project-based lessons, WebQuests and ThinkQuests

 

BROKERS OF EXPERTISE

http://www.myboe.org

California repository of educational websites, including lessons, contributed by state educators. 

 

MICROSOFT LESSON PLAN COLLECTION

http://encarta.msn.com/schoolhouse

Hundreds of lessons complete with worksheets and more.

 

PBS TEACHER SOURCE

http://www.pbs.org/teachersource/search.htm

2000 lessons searchable by grade and subject, linked to standards.

 

ULTIMATER LESSON PLAN GUIDE

http://education.une.edu/the-ultimate-lesson-plan-guide/

Supports the University of New England Masterís of Education program

 

LESSON PLANS PAGE

http://www.lessonplanspage.com/

1,500+ Free Lesson Plans for PreK-12, searchable by subject.

 

PACBELL KNOWLEDGE EDUCATION FIRST

http://www.kn.pacbell.com/

A deep, rich source of information on technology-infused learning activities.

 

DISCOVERY SCHOOL

http://www.discoveryeducation.com/teachers/free-lesson-plans/index.cfm

Reviewed lessons, some of which link to Discovery Channel programming; includes teaching aids.

 
BELLINGHAM SCHOOL DISTRICT ONLINE RESEARCH INVESTIGATIONS
http://www.bham.wednet.edu/studentgal/onlineresearch/newonline/online.htm
Online tutorials to help students develop research skills

 

REALISTIC DIPLOMAS WEB BASED LESSON PLANS

http://www.realisticdiplomas.com/Web-Based-Lesson-Plans-For-Teachers.aspx

Links to lesson directories

 

ONLINE UNIVERSITY TEACHING RESOURCES

http://www.onlineuniversity.net/education/teaching-resources/

Links to lessons, arranged by subject

 

 

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Maintained by Dr. Lesley Farmer lfarmer@csulb.edu                                                         Updated 11/27/2012