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Student Life and Development Vision




Student Life and Development Vision

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To cultivate leadership excellence.

Student Life and Development Mission Statement

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To develop and implement out-of-classroom programs and services that educates CSULB students about ethical leadership, cultural awareness and positive social change.

What We Do

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Student Life and Development promotes and supports student interests and...

recognizes new student organizations and maintains official university records on student organizations.

 

registers active student organizations in order to authorize university scheduling/publicity privileges for officers and committee chairpersons.

consults with student organization officers and assists them with program planning, organization development and personal leadership development.

supervises and supports major student events such as conferences, cultural shows, distinguished speakers and career-related programs.

approves use of university grounds and facilities for student events and programs.

interprets and administers the CSULB “Regs,” Regulations for Campus Activities, Student Organizations and the Campus Community.

administers travel funds for students participating in academically-related travel primarily for presentations at professional conferences.

promotes opportunities for campus involvement through Orientation to Campus Life.

serves as consults for new and innovative programs that respond to student needs and interest.

Student Life and Development has 6.2 student services professionals and 2 administrative support staff who are assigned special projects that range from coordinating the American Indian Student Services to promoting community service opportunities.  We advise over 350 student organizations that include academic associations, fraternities and sororities, cultural organizations, political and social groups, honor and recognition societies, religious and special interest groups, dance and recreation and career and professional organizations and to a varying degree club sports.  Over the past two years our base budget has been reduced by 17%.

Organizational Chart

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Learning Outcomes 2009-2010

CONFLICT MANAGEMENT

students

  • Students who participate in the “Conflict Management” Workshop will be able to correctly identify the five types of conflict in their appropriate order from easiest to solve to the most challenging.
  • Students who participate in the “Conflict Management” Workshop will be able to select the appropriate strategy for addressing the difficult personality type listed.

ETHICAL DECISION MAKING

  • Students who participate in the “Ethical Decision Making” Workshop will be able to correctly identify at least two tests they can utilize to help them when making ethical decisions.
  • Students who participate in the “Ethical Decision Making” Workshop will be able to correctly identify the greatest obstacle to being a person of character and leading an ethical life.

MULTICULTURALISM

 

  • Students who attend the “Multiculturalism” workshop will be able to identify at least two forms of their privilege.
  • Students who attend the “Multiculturalism” workshop will be able to identify one fact they learned about an ethnic identity group other than their own.

LEADERSHIP THEORY

 

  • As a result of attending the “Leadership Theory” workshop, students will be able to recognize at least two of their leadership traits/characteristics.
  • As a result of attending the “Leadership Theory” workshop, students will be able to identify the leadership theory used as the foundation for leadership development in the Leadership Academy.

 

PERSONAL EXPLORATION

 

  • As a result of attending the “Who Am I?” workshop, students will know their Myers-Briggs personality type?
  • As a result of attending the “Who Am I?” workshop, students will recognize three positive character traits of a leader.

COMMUNICATION

  • Students who participate in the “Communication” Workshop will be able to identify at least two barriers to effective communication.
  • Students who participate in the “Communication” Workshop will be able to identify at least one strategy to improve their communication.

 

IN TAKE PROCESS

 

  • As a result of the In-Take process, students will be able to write Constitution and Bylaws for their organization that include all of the Chancellor’s Office requirements and receive university approval.
  • As a result of the In-Take process, students will be able to identify three requirements needed for student organization officers.

 

CREATING YOUR VISION

  • Students who participate in the “Creating Your Vision” workshop will be able to distinguish the difference between a vision statement and a mission statement.
  • Students who participate in the “Creating Your Vision” workshop will be able to identify at least two reasons a personal vision statement is worth creating.

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Major Initiatives 2010-2011

  • Establish a Financial Literacy Program for CSULB students.

  • Create a new recognition program for student organizations.

  • Build a Men’s Student Success Program.

  • Collaborate with the Residential Learning College, Academic Affairs and Student Transition and Retention Services to develop co-curricular experiences that enhance student learning.

  • Explore funding and implementation process to introduce OrgSync as an on-line tool for student organization management.

  • Develop an action plan to address, mutually agreed upon, areas for improvement based on the CAS Standards self-assessment report.

  • Expand our partnerships with alumni and community members to increase our Lois J. Swanson Leadership Resource Center Board of Directors through “Leadership for the Future Summits.”

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Supporting the Goals of the University and Student Services Division

A college education is more than books, lectures, and caffeine-enriched study sessions.  It is more than a trek on the freeway to an urban institution like CSULB.  It is a plethora of opportunities to discover new avenues to use the information one acquires in the classroom.  How this is accomplished depends on the student, but there are a number of ways one can become engaged.  Activities are available that enrich the classroom experience and allow for a practical evaluation of a major or special interest.  Individuals can develop lifelong friendships, important networking opportunities, and participate in events not accessible within their personal environment. At CSULB, students are able to connect to the culture of the university and hone leadership skills through the efforts and under the guidance of the personnel of Student Life and Development.

The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching reports “…(the) integration of academic and co-curricular life, (suggests) that out-of-class experiences are a vital part of the learning community (Barter Mazola, 1992, p. 203).”  It further states that “becoming a full partner in the higher education community requires articulating more clearly the impact of the co-curricular experience on intellectual development and designing co-curricular environments to promote intellectual development (p. 203).

Astin (1996) asserts that there is power in being an active participant in the culture of the university.  In studies he has reviewed, he offers substantial proof that being involved enhances an undergraduate student’s cognitive and affective development.  Astin found being involved in co-curricular activities has an indirect effect on degree completion, development of leadership and public speaking skills, enhanced self-esteem, and stronger writing skills.  In addition, students who had participated in college life had a higher frequency in volunteering and worked for the betterment of their community.

                   

Dr. Ray De Leon, CSULB Division of Student Services, Office of Program Review