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Division of Student Services Tables of Student Learning Outcomes

Click on the departments below to view student learning outcomes and status reports for 2008-2009:

 

Associated Students, Inc. (ASI)

Career Development Center (CDC)

Counseling & Psychological Services

Dean of Students: The Partners for Success Faculty Mentoring Students Program

Dean of Students: Ethics at the Beach Seminar

Disabled Student Services

Educational Equity Services

Educational Opportunity Program

Housing and Residential Life

Student Health Services

Student Life & Development (SLD)

Student Orientation, Advising, and Registration (SOAR)

Testing, Evaluation & Assessment (TEA): Early Assessment Program

Testing, Evaluation & Assessment (TEA): Test Compliance

University Outreach & School Relations

University Student Union

Women's Resource Center

Timeline for 2009-2010

Associated Students, Inc. (ASI)

Student Learning Outcome

As a result of attending the annual ASI Leadership Retreat, student leaders will demonstrate at least three of the five leadership practices identified in Kouzes’ and Posner’s The Leadership Challenge.

Measurement Tool

Student Leadership Practices Inventory

Relevant Framework
Leadership Development
Status

The Student Leadership Practices Inventory (SLPI) was sent to 66 student leaders prior to the ASI Leadership Retreat in August. Fifty-nine students completed the on-line questionnaire. Data from the self-assessment exercise revealed that the following percentages of student leaders frequently engage in these leadership practices:

  • Modeling the Way: 23.73%                             

  • Inspiring a Shared Vision: 38.98%                 

  • Challenging the Process: 37.29%        

  • Enabling Others To Act: 76.27%              

  • Encouraging the Heart: 40.68%                      

Only 42.37% of the student participants reported demonstrating three or more of the leadership behaviors “often” to “almost always.”

In February, the same group was instructed to select five to eight observers to whom the SLPI Observer instrument would be sent. The observers’ responses were analyzed to see if the students had been observed engaging in practices identified in The Leadership Challenge.

Nineteen of the student leaders who attended the ASI Leadership Retreat participated in the observer assessment. Data from the observer instrument revealed that the percentage of student leaders who frequently engage in the following leadership practices were as follows:

  • Modeling the Way: 63.16%                             

  • Inspiring a Shared Vision: 52.68%        

  • Challenging the Process: 63.16%         

  • Enabling Others To Act: 68.42%            

  • Encouraging the Heart: 31.58%       

Of the student leaders participating in the observer exercise, 78.95% received higher average scores from their observers than they had assigned to themselves previously in August. According to the observers, 63.16% of the students engaged in three or more of the five leadership practices on a frequent basis.

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Career Development Center (CDC)  
Student Learning Outcome

After the completion of a series of career counseling appointments (or workshops) for career/major decision-making, students will be able to demonstrate increased knowledge and confidence in their ability to chose a career or major and be able to identify and utilize a career resource.

Measurement Tool

Career Decision Making Pre & Post Instrument

Relevant Framework
Career Choices
Status

From September 2008 through March 2009, the CDC administered 397 Counseling Pre-Assessment Intake forms to students prior to their first counseling appointments for “career decision-making” or “clarifying career goals." Approximately 3-5 weeks after the students’ first appointments, they were sent an e-mail containing a web-based post-assessment instrument containing the same questions.  Seventy-one respondents completed the post-assessment instrument, for a response rate of 18%.  The pre and post assessment data from these 71 students were collected and analyzed. 

Results for career decision- making include:

  • 47% increase in the number of students who reported that they have increased their level of confidence in choosing a major.
  • 82.8% increase in the number of students who reported they now understand the process about how to make decisions regarding their majors.
  • 39.5% increase in the number of students who reported being able to identify resources to help them choose a major.
  • 47.7% increase in the number of students who reported they are now able to identify their interests and how these relate to their majors.
  • 69% increase in the number of students who reported making a decision about choosing a major.

Results for clarifying career goals include:

  • 88% increase in the number of the students who reported they increased their level of confidence in choosing a career.
  • 166% increase in the number of students who reported they now understand the process of how to make decisions regarding their careers.
  • 50% increase in the number of students who reported being able to identify resources to help them choose a career.
  • 50% increase in the number of students who reported they are now able to identify their interests and how these relate to their careers.
  • 125% increase in the number of students who reported making a decision about their careers.

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Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS)
Student Learning Outcome

As a result of participating in individual counseling (intake assessment and follow-up sessions), students will report improvement in their emotional/psychological well-being and a reduction in the degree that personal problems interfere with their academic performance.

Measurement Tool

Counseling Experience Pre & Post Instrument

Relevant Framework
Healthy Behavior / Satisfying and Productive Lifestyles
Status

Twice a year, CAPS evaluates student counseling experiences by administering a pre and post questionnaire to those who have participated. Since 2006, more than 600 students have responded, and have indicated significant positive gains in their overall well-being and their ability to not let personal problems interfere with academic performance.

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Dean of Students

The Partners for Success Faculty Mentoring Students Program

Student Learning Outcome

Upon completion of the Partners for Success Student Exit Survey, Partners' first-generation, graduating seniors will be able to state at least three ways their mentoring relationship with faculty help them persist to graduation.

Measurement Tool

The Partners Student Exit Survey Form

Relevant Framework

Appreciating Diversity / Personal & Educational Goals

Status

In 2007-2008, 17 partners participated in the exit survey. The respondents, for the most part, strongly agreed that the program assisted them with adjustment and persistence at CSULB while providing a sense of direction, academic advisement, and help with post graduation plans. Qualitative findings revealed that networking opportunites and development of personal relationships with faculty were the highlights of the program. Respondents also indicated a desire to have more opportunities to network with other mentors and mentees in the program.

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Dean of Students

Ethics at the Beach Seminar

Student Learning Outcome

Students who participate in the Ethics at the Beach Seminar will analyze selected scenarios and be able to determine at least two behavioral changes that would reflect how they can translate this training to their personal and professional lives.

Measurement Tool

Post Event Evaluation

Relevant Framework

Clarified Values / Social Responsibility

Status

In the fall of 2008, approximately 50 students attended the Ethics at the Beach Seminar and completed the post event evaluation form. Results indicate that students were able to readily identify behavioral changes that would impact their personal and professional lives, such as making others feel valued, developing greater self awareness, being more respectful of others, honing creativity, and becoming more visionary.

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Disabled Student Services (DSS)

Student Learning Outcome

As a result of their participation in the Stephen Benson Program’s counseling services, learning disabled students will be able to articulate to faculty their specific accommodations required for each course.

Measurement Tool

Pre & Post SBP Evaluation Instrument

Relevant Framework

Effective Communication

Status

In the fall of 2009, approximately 100 learning disabled students will be selected to participate in an evalution of their experiences with the Stephen Benson Program. Each participant will complete a pre and post evaluation questionnaire containing items pertaining to their abilities to develop independence, better understand their disabilities, and gain confidence in discussing accomodation needs with professors. This last item will be the focus on the learning outcomes assessment for this year, with the post evaluation administered during the winter break of 2009 and again at the end of the spring semester in 2010.

A final report of the 2008-2009 study will be available October 1, 2009.

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Educational Equity Services

Student Learning Outcome

As a result of their participation in the McNair Scholars Program, 70% of bachelor's degree recipients will enroll in a post baccalaureate program by the fall term of the academic year immediately following completion of that degree.

Measurement Tool

Student records

Relevant Framework

Intellectual Growth/ Personal & Educational Goals

Status

McNair Scholars are monitored after four years of program participation to see if they enroll in postbaccalaurate programs. In the last five years, the rates of enrollment have ranged from 95-100%. Scholars will continue to be followed in this manner to ensure that the rate of participation in graduate schools remains strong.

The outcome of the objective will be measured in mid to late Octoer of 2009, after a census of enrollment in graduate school is completed for May 2009 graduates.

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Educational Opportunity Program (EOP)

Student Learning Outcome

As a result of partipating in the Summer Bridge Program, at least 60% of students will be successful in developing  academic skills in math and English that will enable them to move to higher levels of pre-college or general education math, or general education English classes.

Measurement Tool

Student records

Relevant Framework

Intellectual Growth/ Personal & Educational Goals

Status

Summer Bridge students from 2007 were very successful in developing their academic abilities in English and math. Out of 64 students, 47 (73%) moved to higher level  math classes (either a higher pre-math class or general math), while 45 (70%) moved to general English classes.

Summer Bridge students from 2008 were successful in developing their academic abilities in English and math. Out of 29 students, 25students (86%) were promoted to higher level math courses (either a higher pre-bacc. math class or general education math), while 16 students (55%) were promoted to general education English courses.

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Housing and Residential Life

Student Learning Outcome

As a result of participating in the first orientation/building meeting, residents will be able to explain the role of their Resident Assistant and identify at least three different programs and services offered to residents by Housing and Residential Life.

Measurement Tool

Pre and Post Event Instrument

Relevant Framework

Independence

Status

Students living in residence halls for the first time in fall of 2009 will be required to attend an orientation meeting, where they will meet resident assistants and learn about programs offered through Residential Life. To measure growth in knowledge pertaining to resident assistants and opportunities to participate in programs, participating students will complete a pre and post instrument.

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Student Health Services

Student Learning Outcome

After attending the Sexual Health Awareness Workshop, students will be able to perform self-breast examination, identify proper preparation procedures for the gynecological exam, and perform proper condom application.

Measurement Tool

Written pre-test/post-test, and direct observation of condom application on a phallic model during the workshop

Relevant Framework

Healthy Behavior

Status

Beginning in spring 2007, development of student knowledge after attending SHAW was measured by a pre and post instrument containing ten items.. Results for 68 students who participated in the Spring of 2008 show significant gains before and after participating in the workshop. Before attending the workshop, students on average were able to answer 7.66 of the items; after attending the workshop, the same students were able to answer 9.57 of the items.

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Student Life & Development (SLD)

Student Learning Outcome

Students who complete the Creating Your Vision Workshop will be able to articulate in written form the difference between a mission statement and vision statement and identify at least two key elements that go into creating a personal vision.

Measurement Tool

Post Event Instrument

Relevant Framework

Clarified Values / Spiritual Awareness

Status

The "Creating Your Vision" workshop was facilitated nine times during the 2008 - 2009 academic year. Two-hundred-thirteen students participated, with an average workshop attendance of 24. One-hundred-eighty-two of the 213 participants completed the Learning Outcomes and Evaluation instrument. Of the 182 respondents, 87% successfully achieved the following learning outcomes:

  • Articulate in writing the difference between a mission statement and vision statement.
  • Identify two possible elements that go into creating a personal vision statement.

Ninety-one percent successfully answered the first of the two learning outcomes. A rubric was created to evaluate participant responses.

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Student Orientation, Advising, & Registration (SOAR)

Student Learning Outcome

Freshmen and transfer students who complete a SOAR workshop will be able to correctly match the following areas to one of their primary functions: the Horn Center (houses computer lab), University Student Union (location of ASI), PE Building  (intramural sports), Counseling & Psychological Services (get personal help), Testing & Evaluation Services (information about the WPE), and Student Health Services (ATD programs).

Measurement Tool

Post Event Instrument

Relevant Framework

Personal & Educational Goals

Status

In summer 2008, freshmen and transfer students who completed a SOAR workshop completed the SOAR Evaluation form, which contained a section related to matching areas with their functions. Results indicate that among freshmen, more than 75% answered the matching quiz correctly for each area; for transfer students, more than 81% did so.

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Testing, Evaluation & Assessment (TEA)

Early Assessment Program

Student Learning Outcome

As a result of participating in the June 2008 EAP Math Workshop, high school math teachers will feel they benefited from collaborating with other participants and will be able to describe at least two concrete ways that the collaboration facilitated their teaching.

Measurement Tool

Post Event Instrument

Relevant Framework

Intellectual Growth

Status

Twelve teachers participated in the June 25, 2008 EAP math workshop and completed the post even instrument. On a scale of 1-5, where 5=strongly agree, teachers gave a score of 4.25 for benefits of collaborating with other particpants. They felt the collaborations helped them learn how to create level two problems with a partner's help, how to teach specific topics, how to use different strategies to teach concepts, and how to better assess students apart from testing them.

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Testing, Evaluation & Assessment (TEA)

Test Compliance

Student Learning Outcome

As a result of receiving 30 minutes of one-on-one counseling with the Test Compliance Officer and signing a compliance contract, students will comply with the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR) within one semester.

Measurement Tool

Database Tracking and Student Records

Relevant Framework

Independence / Personal & Educational Goals

Status

From July 2008-May 2009 , 621 students out of compliance with the GWAR were mentored about the requirement and completed contracts agreeing to comply within a semester. Four-hundred-ninety-one (79%) of these students did so by taking the WPE, GRE, or GMAT within one semester of working with the Test Compliance Officer. Students will continue to be mentored about their need to attempt the GWAR in the required timeline. Students who are not successful  meeting the GWAR in their first attempt will have time to follow advisement about how to pass the GWAR before they finish coursework required for graduation.

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University Outreach & School Relations

Student Learning Outcome

After attending the CSULB Annual Counselor's conference, the majority of high school and community college counselors will rate the event as "excellent." Moreover, they will state that the even was informative and gave them opportunities for networking.

Measurement Tool

Post Event Evaluation Form

Relevant Framework

Collaboration / Personal & Educational Goals

Status

Results from conferences held every year from 2000 to 2008 indicate that the majority of counselors felt the overall experience to be "excellent." In 2008, 267 counselors attended the event, with 68% reporting that it was "excellent," and 27% reporting that it was good, for a total of 95% with high ratings. Moreover, counselors at the event stated that it was very informative, and a wonderful program that gave participants valuable collaboration opportunities.

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University Student Union

Student Learning Outcome

As a result of completing the Programming Training Workshop, student programmers will satisfy the Fiscal and Scheduling certification training requirements and will be able to pass the Event Planner Quiz.

Measurement Tool

Event Planner Quiz

Relevant Framework

Collaboration / Leadership Development

Status

USU/ASI Programs Training Day:  In August 2008, the Programs Division of USU/ASI planned and implemented a student programs training day that incorporated a multi-faceted approach to train student volunteers on  the critical factors of event planning. 

All USU/ASI programmers were mandated to attend this workshop which was facilitated by ASI full time program staff and included the following areas: AS Commissions, Program Council and KBeach Concerts.  Topics that were addressed included contracts, negotiating, publicity, volunteer retention, communications, campus logistics and ASI legal liability. 

At the end of the training, participants were given both an event planning quiz as well as an evaluation form.  Approximately 30 student programmers attended this day long training and took the Event Planners Quiz.  All 30 participants passed the quiz with a 100% pass rate.  Additionally, the event coordinators conducted a workshop evaluation.  The evaluation highlighted areas of improvement that could potentially make the training day more effective. Ninety-four percent of the respondents said the workshop and quiz were beneficial to their out-of-classroom skill development.  Overall, the response was favorable as students enjoyed working in such a collaborative manner. 

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Women's Resource Center

Student Learning Outcome

As a result of attending the Women and Careers Conference, 50% of the student attendees will be able to identify three of the best places to obtain information about careers, identify the best time to start planning their careers, and identify at least two of the major factors that impact women’s career successes.

Measurement Tool

Pre and Post Event Instrument

Relevant Framework

Appreciating Diversity & Career Choices

Status

March 2009 Women and Careers Conference attendees completed a pre-event survey instrument indicating their general career-related knowledge. Results were as follows:

The best places to obtain information about careers:

  • 60%:  the Career Development Center, Job Fairs, friends, acquaintances and professional contacts as their top choices
  • 8%: advisors and mentoring programs

The best time to start planning their careers:

  • 51%: when taking classes at CSULB
  • 40%: in high school so they could plan their college classes
  • 27%: after interning so they had experience.

Three factors strongly aligned with women’s career success:

  • 67%: education
  • 38%: early exploration into careers,an advanced degree, or internships

To the pre-conference survey question, “When looking for a job, who you know makes a difference:

  • 95% agreed

Exit evaluations

  • 62% had connected with five or more new people
  • 80% wanted a mentor, though mentors were not highly rated initially

Exit evaluations also showed that attendees learned the following:

  • Best places to gain career information varies but includes areas identified plus mentors
  • Best time to start exploration is in high school
  • Education, early career exploration, and mentors were primary markers of successful professional women.

Exit evaluations revealed that new strategies had been learned related to resumes and interviews.  The questionnaire asked about the value of worksheets and handouts provided, why students attended, their favorite part of the conference, the most valuable part of the conference, and what they would change for future conferences. Responses will be used for future planning.

Overall, 96% of attendees felt the conference was successful in introducing them to new ideas for their career pursuits and they would strongly recommend it to others.

Timeline for 2009-2010

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Due dates

Activity

Responsible party

By Sept 4

Write and submit up to three learning outcomes to Manuel

Department leaders

By Sept 17

Review and select learning outcome(s) for each department to be measured in 2009-2010; work with department leaders to edit their  respective outcomes, if necessary

Learning Outcomes Committee

By Sept 28

Submit edited version of learning outcome(s) to Manuel

Department leaders

By Oct 16

Upload edited versions to the CSULB student assessment website; notify department leaders of the upload

Susan, Jeff

By November 2

Submit status update for 2009-2010

Department leaders

By November 6

Upload status update to the CSULB student assessment website

Susan, Jeff

By February 1

Submit status update #2 for 2009-2010

Department leaders

By February 5

Upload status update #2 to the CSULB student assessment website

Susan, Jeff

By May 21

Submit final summary for 2009-2010

Department Leaders

June 3

Present summary to division managers

Division managers and/or Learning Outcomes Committee

On-going

Send updates to Manuel; update website

Department leaders; Susan, Jeff

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