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Division of Student Services
Tables of Student Learning Outcomes

Click on the departments below to view student learning outcomes processes for 2013-2014:

Associated Students, Inc. (ASI)

Student Learning Outcome
Students participating in student government as an elected or appointed officer during the 2013-2014 year will improve their interpersonal competence in areas such as effective communication, interdependence, collaboration, and effective leadership.
Measurement Tool
The ASUOP Leadership Experience Learning Benefits Survey adapted for use by CSULB Associated Students, Inc.
Relevant Framework

 Interpersonal Competence

Practical Competence

Activity

An on-line survey was launched on May 16 to a list of 114 student government participants. Responses were collected until midnight on Saturday, May 31. Reminder e-mails were sent on Friday, May 23 and Wednesday, May 28.

Outcomes & use of findings
 

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Career Development Center (CDC)  
Student Learning Outcome
Sophomore engineering students at risk for probation who participate in career counseling and use Choices, O*Net, and/or the University catalog to evaluate major options will be able to select an appropriate major based on self-examination of academic strengths, interests and career decision making self-efficacy.

 

Measurement Tool
Case study
Relevant Framework

Intrapersonal Development

Practical Competence-Pursuing goals

Activity

The Career Development Center will take a case study approach in its student learning outcomes research on sophomore engineering students. The case studies will focus on three engineering students who have expressed concerns regarding successful completion of the engineering major. These concerns stem from difficulty in successfully completing the coursework to lack of interest in the major. These intense studies and observations will provide rich details to help counselors understand the needs of engineering students. More importantly, these needs will be addressed through appropriate counseling and advising interventions to be completed within 3 to 5 sessions.  

Outcomes & use of findings
Forthcoming in the 2014-2015 AY

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Center for Scholarship Information (CSI)
Student Learning Outcome
Ninety percent of students who receive the Hot Scholarships flyer via email will apply for at least one scholarship listed during the spring semester application cycle.
Measurement Tool
Students who receive the flyer will be compared to a list of applicants in the CSI online application database.
Relevant Framework

Knowledge Acquisition, Construction, Integration & Application- Connecting knowledge to other knowledge, ideas and experiences

Activity

At the beginning of spring semester, the Hot Scholarships flyer was sent via email to 672 current students who have visited the Center and requested to receive email notification about scholarship opportunities.  Students on the list who indicated that they would be graduating in Spring 2014 were excluded from the email as they would not be eligible to receive the scholarship in the fall semester.

During the 2014 spring semester scholarship cycle, CSI received 783 applications through the online system. 

Outcomes & use of findings

Comparing the list of students who received email notifications and the list of students who applied for spring scholarships, 16 students were present on both lists.  Therefore, 2% of the students who received the Hot Scholarships flyer via email eventually applied for one of the scholarships on the list.

Based on the results, the Center is going to reevaluate the use of the email list.  Although we utilize a multitude of marketing avenues to reach students, we plan to contact the students on the email list to find out why they did not apply for scholarships as well as explore more effective marketing methods for our scholarships.

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Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS)
Student Learning Outcome

As a result of participating in individual counseling (intake assessment and follow-up sessions), students will report improvement in their emotional/psychological well-being and a reduction in the degree that personal problems interfere with their academic performance.

Measurement Tool

Counseling Experience, Self-reported responses to survey questions

Relevant Framework
Practical Competence- Maintaining health and wellness
Activity

Two times a year (November 2013 and March, 2014), CAPS evaluates student counseling experiences by administering a student evaluation of their experiences in receiving services at CAPS.  They are asked to evaluate their current wellbeing after beginning their counseling experience. Over the last six years, student responses have indicated significant positive gains in their overall well-being and their ability to not let personal problems interfere with academic performance. The next survey will be conducted in early November, 2014.

Outcomes & use of findings

At intake, 59% of clients reported that their personal problems “extremely” or “very much” interfered with their academic performance before coming to counseling.  This percent dropped to 24.5 after they received counseling.

At intake, 68.8% reported their overall well-being to be “poor” or “extremely poor.”  After receiving counseling, only 9.45% of clients described their overall well-being as “poor” or “extremely poor.”

Regarding overall satisfaction of CAPS’ services, 60% of CAPS clients reported being “very satisfied” and 34.95% “satisfied (combined 95.8%) with their overall experience at CAPS.

Along with other data collected, the above cited student perceptions are used to evaluate CAPS services to meet student needs and learning/development goals.

We will continue to monitor our counseling practices and strive to keep the same positive outcomes that we saw in 2013-14.

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Disabled Student Services (DSS)

Student Learning Outcome

Students with autism or Asperger's syndrome who regularly participate in the Learning Independence for Empowerment (LIFE) project will be able to navigate the campus independently and will develop skills necessary for successful social interaction.

Measurement Tool

Peer coaching program data collection

Intake assessment

Relevant Framework

Intrapersonal Competence- Realistic self-appraisal, self-understanding and self-respect

Interpersonal Competence- Interdependence, Collaboration

Activity

Reports of student progress on goals related to social, academic and independence skills are submitted at the end of each academic semester by peer coachesof the LIFE Project. Additionally, participants complete and submit surveys at the end of each semester for the purposes of evaluating different components of this program.

Twenty-four workshops were provided by 14 speakers (10 staff members and 4 guest speakers) .

Outcomes & use of findings

Progress was made in personal goals and the peer coaching aspect of the program. The effectiveness of the weekly workshops provided were also rated highly by participants.

Twenty-eight students are currently utilizing services provided by this program. While some only participate in workshops and others in the peer-coaching component, the majority is involved in both aspects of this program. Of those working as peer coaches,achieved goals increased from the fall semester (69.5%) to the spring semester (75%). Those not achieving goals decreased from 17.4% to 0%, with the current number of goals partially met /in progress being 25%. Based on responses provided by participants, 100% felt that the goals they were working on were relevant and motivating. Over 90% of students felt that the working with a peer coach helped them succeed in academic work as well as social interactions. Over 90% of the participants also stated that they would recommend this program to others.

Over 90% of those who participated in workshops stated that these were both enjoyable and informative.

Based on results, we plan to continue implementing the weekly workshops with more collaboration both on and off campus for presentations. We will also continue to hire and train qualified peer coaches to work with students in the program.

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Educational Equity Services

SSSP, CAMP & Upward Bound

Student Learning Outcome
After completing the Financial Literacy 101 modules, 90% of participants will indicate increased self-efficacy related to personal finance goals and financial self-assessment.
Measurement Tool

Mandatory pre- and post- Student Self-Assessment surveys within the Financial Literacy 101 (FL101) modules which measure financial attitudes, personal economic tendencies, budgeting and self-efficacy

The pre-survey consists of 17 questions; the post-survey consists of 5-12 questions, depending on the module level.

Participants must score at least 70% on the built-in quiz to complete the module levels and submit the post-survey.

Relevant Framework

Knowledge Acquisition, Construction, Integration & Application- Connecting knowledge to other knowledge, ideas and experiences

Relevance is key to integration. FL101 analyzes each student’s financial behavior and gives personalized recommendations based on their pre- self-assessment survey. Students have continued access to the information in over 30 modules covering 60+ topics after completing the initial module.

Practical Competence- Pursuing goals, managing personal affairs, and maintaining health and wellness

Financial stresses and lack of personal financial awareness have significant impacts on students now and influence their futures. Every student completes a personal budget and sets financial goals within FL101, and again, they have access to these tools 24/7.

*Note- we do not have access to their personal budgets and goals data unless students choose to share.

Activity

Participants completed mandatory pre- and post- Student Self-Assessment surveys within the Financial Literacy 101 (FL101) modules which measure financial attitudes, personal economic tendencies, budgeting and self-efficacy.

Outcomes & use of findings

82% of the 266 students who participated in Financial Literacy 101 passed the built-in quizzes with a 70% or higher.

The mandatory pre- and post- Student Self-Assessment surveys yielded interesting and positive results regarding perceived increases in financial knowledge and attitudes as well as personal self-efficacy.

Examples of findings from the pre-self-assessment are:

  • 65% friends were their single main source of information about money and how to manage it
  • 60% knew little to nothing at all about the consequences of misusing credit cards.
  • 80% knewlittle to nothing at all about the pros and cons of credit cards compared to other kinds of debt (such as student loans)
  • 65% knew little to nothing at all about the consequences of a low credit score
  • 75% do not keep a monthly budget of expenses
  • 20% currently have to borrow money on credit cards to pay for expenses such as food, rent, books or tuition
  • 62% feel somewhat to completely prepared to pay for their college education

Student self-perceptions of changes yielded the following results from the mandatory post-assessment:

  • 96% stated their knowledge increased regarding the consequences of misusing credit cards
  • 93% stated their knowledge increased regarding the impact of changing interest rates on credit card payments
  • 92% stated their knowledge increased regarding the pros and cons of credit cards compared to other kinds of debt
  • 98 % Agree overall, this is a good course.
  • 91% Agree, would recommend this course to my friends.
  • 91% Agree overall, learned a lot from this course.
  • 97% Agree the course examples helped them understand the subject matter.

83% Agree the course was interesting.

Based on the findings, it is evident that increasing financial literacy resources to our student population is needed. Plans to expand the module into multiple levels have begun in order to facilitate deeper and more nuanced personal finance information. Goals are to have all program participants complete the initial module and then to complete other levels in the following years.

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Educational Opportunity Program (EOP)

Student Learning Outcome

As a result of attending the EOP Freshman Orientation in Summer 2013, students will improve their awareness in the following areas of financial aid: deadlines, document retrieval process and the differences between grants and loans.

Measurement Tool

Pre-Test Information (EOP Orientation Summer 2013), Post-Test Survey (EOP 100 in Fall 2013)

Relevant Framework

Knowledge Acquisition, Construction, Integration, & Application

Activity
 
Outcomes & use of findings
 

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Housing and Residential Life

Student Learning Outcome

First-year Beachside Residential College students who meet with their Residential Academic Advisor once a semester and attend two academic workshops will learn and become familiar with different campus resources, know which academic college they are a part of and who to visit for major academic advising, know where to go to get their Freshman Mandatory Advising, and analyze and interpret their academic requirements report.

Measurement Tool
Pre/Post Questionnaire
Relevant Framework
Knowledge Acquisition, Construction, Integration, & Application
Activity
Forthcoming in the 2014-2015 AY
Outcomes & use of findings
 

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Multicultural Center

Student Learning Outcome
Students who participate in the Students Talk About Race: (STAR) workshop will be able to display knowledge of three core elements of cross-cultural competency, correctly match definitions of key terms related to diversity, and identify three strategies for effective cross-communication.
Measurement Tool
Post workshop questionnaire and quiz
Relevant Framework

Humanitarianism & Civic Engagement - Understanding and appreciating cultural and human differences

Practical Competence- Communicating effectively

Activity
 
Outcomes & use of findings
 

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Student Health Services

Student Learning Outcome

Students participating in the HRC Peer Educator SAFE Bystander program will increase knowledge of sexual assault, contributing factors and prevention techniques and provide the SAFE Bystander presentation to college students at least three times.

Measurement Tool

Pre and post test for peer educators

Satisfaction and post-test for audience

Productivity reports of all outreach events conducted for SAFE Bystander activities

 

Relevant Framework

Knowledge Acquisition, Construction, Integration, & Application

Interpersonal Competence- Effective leadership

Practical Competence-Communicating effectively

Activity
Peer Educator Program Summary Report
Outcomes & use of findings
Please click on the above link.

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Student Life & Development (SLD)

Student Learning Outcome

Students participating in the Men’s Success Initiative (MSI) program will increase their level of engagement on campus by building connections with faculty, staff, students, and resources on campus. 

Measurement Tool

Students will be assessed with regard to their past history of usage of campus resources and support programs and the frequency of their self-initiated interactions with faculty as well as support staff and other students on campus.

Relevant Framework

Practical Competence- Pursuing goals

Activity
 
Outcomes & use of findings
 

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Student Orientation, Advising, & Registration (SOAR)

Student Learning Outcome

Freshmen who participate in the SOAR Program will be able to identify key campus resources and their locations with at least 75% accuracy.

Measurement Tool
Post Assessment
Relevant Framework
Practical Competence
Activity
Forthcoming; students will complete a questionnaire in August 2014.
Outcomes & use of findings
 

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Student Recreation and Wellness Center

Fitness

Student Learning Outcome

New SRWC participants who complete ten personal training sessions during Spring Semester will increase their awareness of their personal health and wellness.  

Measurement Tool

Pre and post assessment

Relevant Framework

Knowledge Acquisition, Construction, Integration, and Application

Practical Competence-Maintaining health and wellness

Activity
Ten students completed the pre and post assessment during the Spring Semester of 2014.  This number represents nearly 1/3rd of the overall student participants in personal training.
Outcomes & use of findings

90% of the SRWC participants who completed 10 personal training sessions during the spring semester reported an increased awareness of their physical well being.

80% of the participants who completed 10 personal training sessions in the spring semester reported an increased awareness of their mental/emotional well being.

70% of the SRWC participants who completed 10 personal training sessions in the spring semester reported a decrease in their stress levels.

80% of the SRWC participants who completed 10 personal training sessions in the spring semester reported an increased awareness of their overall personal health and wellness.

In the future, we plan to assess participants at the beginning and end of the semester/year rather than at the completion of 10 personal training sessions. Many can complete 10 sessions in a few weeks.  This will allow us to assess more significant, long-term learning and impact.

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University Outreach and School Relations (UOSR)

The President's Scholarship Program

Student Learning Outcome

Students participating in the President’s Scholars Program Distinguished Speaker and Leadership Institute will learn about effective leadership and apply their knowledge by stating qualities of leadership and identifying university leadership opportunities, build intrapersonal skills by writing down areas of leadership development for themselves, and demonstrate interpersonal competence by applying leadership skills in a group activity.

Measurement Tool

Quantitative – Survey

Qualitative – Observation of group leadership activity

Relevant Framework

Knowledge Acquisition, Construction, Integration, and Application

Intrapersonal Development

Interpersonal Competence

Activity

Interim President Donald Para served as the Distinguished Leadership speaker. Following President’ Para’s presentation, President’s Scholars engaged with  President Para about his leadership philosophy and practice.  Following the seminar break, Scholars participated in an interactive leadership exercise facilitated by leadership consultant Randy Zarn.  At the conclusion of the event the attendees were asked to complete a questionnaire that contained eight items.  The questionnaire was comprised of five open ended free response items and three 5-point Likert scale rating items.

Outcomes & use of findings

Results from the survey indicate that attendees (29 in total) demonstrated knowledge acquisition by identifying insights they had in regards to their leadership development.  Through open-ended reportin,g the common top three leadership development insights were 1) failure can equal growth (28% of responders),   2) servant leadership (17% of responders), and3) taking chances to move forward (17% of responders). 

In terms of intrapersonal development, attendees identified leadership qualities through an open-ended question format that were seen as most important to being an effective leader.  The top three qualities were servant leaders (34% of responders), communication (24% of responders), and empathy (24% of responders).

Insights for practical application of the concepts learned were demonstrated by attendees who indicated they would take opportunities to get involved in leadership at CSULB.  The top three indicated opportunities were ASI (83% of responders), Leadership Academy (72% of responders), and student organizations (52% of responders).

Regarding overall satisfaction with the event’s guest speakers, attendees’ average rating of the speakers was 4.69 on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent).

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Veterans Services

Student Learning Outcome

Student veterans who attend the New Student Veteran Orientation will learn the process for receiving Veterans Administration educational benefits while studying at CSULB.

Measurement Tool

Students will demonstrate knowledge of the certification process by successfully submitting all forms required to receive VA educational benefits to the Veterans Affairs Services Office.

Relevant Framework

Practical Competence- Pursuing goals

Activity
Forty-eight students participated in the fall 2013 orientation.
Outcomes & use of findings

Forty-one students determined they were eligible for benefits and had these benefits certified.

We will hold new student orientations immediately after SOAR in July 2014 to ensure that all of our incoming veterans are properly informed of our services and procedures to receive their GI Bill Benefits.

Timeline for 2013-2014

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Due dates

Activity

Participants

August 14, 2013 Student Learning Outcomes Grant Application Due Students Services Departments; grant winners announced at annual post-convocation managers' meeting on August 23, 2013
September 17, 2013 SLO Advisory Committee Meeting 2 p.m.  
October 18, 2013 Student Learning Outcomes Workshop

Featured presentations:

Grant winners from 2012-2013

Student Life & Development

Career Development Center

Student Services & Academic Affairs

November 5, 2013 SLO Advisory Committee Meeting 1 p.m. SLO Committee Members
November 8 , 2013

Student Learning Outcomes Statements Due

 

Student Services Managers and Staff

 

November 13 , 2013 Student Learning Outcomes Statements for 2013-2014 posted on CSULB Assessment Website Testing, Evaluation & Assessment
January 14, 2014 SLO Advisory Committee Meeting 2 p.m. SLO Committee Members
January 17, 2014

Student Learning Outcomes Workshop

Focus on Use of Results

Student Services & Academic Affairs
February 17, 2014 SLO Advisory Committee Meeting 3 p.m. SLO Committee Members
March 10, 2014 SLO Advisory Committee Meeting 3 p.m. SLO Committee Members
April 28, 2014 SLO Advisory Committee Meeting 3 p.m. SLO Committee Members
May 30, 2014 Student Learning Outcomes report for 2013-2014 due Student Services Managers and Staff
June 6, 2014

Year's synopsis:

Student Services Managers' Retreat

Student Services Managers

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