Skip to Local Navigation
Skip to Content
California State University, Long Beach
CSULB Catalog Banner
Print this page Add this page to your favorites Select a font size Select a small font Select a medium font Select a large font
 

History

College of Liberal Arts

Pete the Prospector Statue

History - HIST Upper Division Courses

UPPER DIVISION AREAS


NOTE: General Education Category A must be completed prior to taking any upper-division course except upper-division language courses where students meet formal prerequisites and/or competency equivalent for advanced study.

Courses with asterisk (*) available for undergraduate and graduate credit.
300. The United States Past and Present (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Upper-division survey, may not be taken for credit in the United States field. For upper-division transfer students in lieu of HIST 172 and 173.

 

*301. Methodology of History (4)
Prerequisite: Required of all History majors in their first semester of work in the major.
Introduction to historiography and methodological issues, skills and competencies exercises, research methods, research presentations, and peer review. Creation of student portfolio used in remaining upper-division courses in major and assessed in HIST 499.
Letter grade only (A-F).

 

*302. Theory and History (4)
Prequisite: HIST 301. Required of all History majors. Must be taken in the semester immediately following successful completion of HIST 301.
Introduction to history of historical profession, conceptual categories of historical inquiry, the ways theory shapes historical research and writing. Focuses on case studies, significant historical works, major schools of historical interpretation and recent historigraphic trends.
Letter grade only (A-F).

 

303I. Rebels and Renegades (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Exploration of music, literature and art used by 20th century social and political activists in an effort to understand the goals, tactics and accomplishments such activists use to make the world more just, inclusive and peaceful.
Not available for credit in the minor.

 

*304. The Holocaust (3)
Examines the destruction of European Jews by Nazi Germany during the Second World War. Students will trace the roots of antisemitism in European history, the origins of Hitler’s anti-Jewish assault, and the process from ghettoization to extermination.

 

308I. Law and Civilization (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Exploration of law as an intellectual effort to define, direct, and administer human experience. Examination of theories of knowledge, language, meaning, mental processes, social organization, personal responsibility and freedom underlying legal analysis and decision-making in courts as well as in administrative/bureaucratic settings.
Not available for credit in the minor.

 

309I. Men and Masculinity (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Exploration of male roles from an interdisciplinary perspective focusing on men as workers, friends, lovers, and fathers. Consideration of the choices available to men under the impact of tradition, feminism, and a changing job market. Gender-oriented social and political movements.
Letter grade only (A-F).

 

310I. The Greek World (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Examines major events and ideas in society and culture of ancient Greece. Emphasis on literature, the arts, and history. Topics include Minoan civilization, Homer and the Trojan War, mythology and religion, lyric poetry, the Persian Wars, the "Golden Age" of Athens, the Peloponesian War, and Hellenistic culture.
Same course as CLSC 311I.

 

312I. Roman World (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Examines major events and ideas in the society and culture of ancient Rome. Emphasis on literature, the arts, and history. Topics include genesis and growth of the Roman world, transition from Republic to Empire, imperial maturity, decay and decline, and the contributions of the Romans to the modern world.
Same course as CLSC 312I.

 

313. Ancient Greece (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
History of the Greeks and the Greek world from the earliest times to the Roman conquest.

 

314. Roman History (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
History of Rome and the Roman world from the Eighth Century B.C. to the Fifth Century A.D.

 

*316. Early Middle Ages (3)
History of Western Civilization from the fall of the Roman Empire in the West to the Crusades. Germanization of the West, evolution of Christian institutions, Slavic expansion, Byzantinization of the Eastern Empire, Islamic civilization, Carolingian age, feudal and manorial institutions.

 

*317. High Middle Ages (3)
History of Western Civilization from the Crusades to the end of the Middle Ages. Revival of trade, growth of towns and of capitalism, origins of modern political institutions, and medieval learning and art.

 

*318. Byzantine Empire (3)
History of the Byzantine Empire from the 4th century AD to Constantinople’s fall in 1453; the cultural heritage of the Roman Empire in the eastern Mediterranean; religious controversies and development of eastern Christianity; relations with Islam and medieval Europe.

 

319. Women in the Ancient and Medieval West (3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 100.
Examines roles and experiences of women in Western Europe from prehistory to the sixteenth century. Themes may include: construction of gender roles, relation between symbols and reality, interaction of private/public life, access to power/opportunity; the possibility of a “women’s culture.”
Same course as W/ST 312.

 

331. History of Modern Europe, 1789 - Present (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
This course introduces the social, political, cultural, and economic changes that have transformed European societies from the French Revolution to the present.
Letter grade only (A-F).

 

332. The Age of the Renaissance (3)
Examines remarkable transformation of Europe during the Renaissance period (1350-1550), including themes of humanism and artistic and literary developments; humanism and politics; religion in the “Age of Reason.” Particular emphasis on relationship between power and culture in Italian civilization.

 

*333. Reformation Europe (3)
Examination and analysis of the “long 16th century,” from the beginning of the Italian Wars (1494) to the Peace of Westphalia (1648). Emphasis on economic, institutional, intellectual and religious crises, and on their resolutions in the post-Reformation period.

 

*334. Early Modern France, 1589-1789 (3)
Spanning French history from the advent of the Bourbon monarchy until its demise with the French Revolution, this course will expose students to the political, social, economic, and cultural developments that attended the domestic and international expansion of the French state.

 

*335. The Shaping of Modern Europe (3)
European political, social, economic and intellectual life from 1500 to 1789. Reviews Renaissance and Reformation, then traces the crisis of absolutism, the consolidation of state authority, rise of scientific and enlightened ideas, and the origins of the French Revolution.

 

*336. The French Revolution and Napoleon (3)
End of the Old Regime and the French Revolution. Decline of the feudal monarchy, failure of enlightened despotism, the rise of revolutionary thought, French Revolution, and Napoleonic imperialism.

 

337. Europe in the Nineteenth Century (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Commencing with Napoléon’s empire and concluding with the fin-de-siècle, this course will examine industrialization and its repercussions; popular protest and revolution; nationalism; class consciousness; feminism; imperialism; and emergent ideologies (conservatism, liberalism, socialism; communism).

 

338. Modern European Women's History (3)
Investigates how European history has impacted on women, and how women and women’s issues have shaped historical events. Issues covered are: industrialization, the family, wars and revolutions, health and sexuality, and the “woman question” in politics, culture and society.
Same course as W/ST 384.

 

339. Europe, 1890-1945 (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Explores the political, social, economic, international, and cultural crises prior to the First World War; the rise of totalitarianism in the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany, the Spanish Civil War, the Second World War, and the Holocaust.

 

*340. Europe Since 1945 (3)
Examines the political, social, economic, and cultural history of Europe since the end of World War II. Themes include post-war recovery, the Cold War, decolonization, the fall of communism, the transformation of Central Europe, and the European Union.

 

341A. Foundations of Russia (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Evolution of the state structure, diverse cultural patterns, and social structures associated with ancient Kiev Russia: rise of Moscow, origins of autocracy and serfdom; westernization and modernization as problems during the imperial period to 1801. Particular emphasis on social history.

 

341B. Modern Russia (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Interaction with the West from 1801; era of great reforms and revolutionary movements; downfall of imperial Russia; establishment of the Soviet regime; chief political, social, economic and cultural developments in the Soviet era; role of the Soviet Union in world affairs.

 

343. Modern Eastern Europe (3)
Prerequisite: GE Foundation or consent of instructor.
Examines modern Eastern Europe from the emergence of nation states, to nationalism, world wars, fascism, Communism, conformity, dissent, and revolution. We will explore the role of Eastern Europe as a place and as an idea in modern Europe.

 

345. Comparative Genocide (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Explores the modern phenomenon of mass killings of targeted populations in order to achieve a particular demographic, political, or cultural goal. Examines a series of case studies - including the Armenian Genocide, the Holocaust, Cambodia, and Rwanda - to understand not only how and why genocides occur, but also to look at the possibilities of preventative action.

 

346I. The European Cinema of Communism, Fascism, and Resistance (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the GE Foundation, one or more Exploration courses, and upper division standing.
Focuses on European cinema of the twentieth century as a manifestation of totalitarian and ideological movements preceding, in-between, and following the two world wars. The ensuing and ongoing resistance movements will also be examined.
Same course as RGR 346I and FEA 346I.

 

347. Tradition and Crisis: Jews in Eastern Europe (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Explores the history of Eastern European Jewry, from its medieval origins to its destruction in the twentieth century. In particular, the course examines the impact of absolutist rule and the attempts to create new frameworks for Jewish identity.

 

348. Emancipation and Assimilation: Modern Jewish History of Western Europe (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of the GE Foundation, one or more Exploration courses, and upper division standing.
Examines modern Jewish history in Western Europe. Topics include the ideas behind emancipation, the attempts to achieve it, and efforts to reconcile Jewishness with modern citizenship.

 

349. The History of Food (3)
Prerequisite: HIST 211 or 131 or consent of undergraduate/graduate advisor.
Religious and secular role of food, its connection to issues of identity, and significance of securing reliable sources of sustenance as central to political, economic, and military agendas all underline the usefulness of studying food and our complicated relationships with it throughout history.

 

*351. Medieval England (3)
Analysis of English political institutions, society, religion and economy in the Anglo-Saxon, Norman, Plantaganet, and late medieval eras.

 

*353. Tudor and Stuart England (3)
Social, cultural, religious, political, and dynastic history of England from 1485 to 1714. Renaissance and Reformation; Crown and Parliament; civil war and revolution; the pre-industrial economy; relations with Scotland, Ireland, Europe, and America.

 

*356. Georgian and Victorian Britain (3)
Social, cultural, religious, political, and constitutional history of Britain from 1714 to 1901. Changes in agriculture, commerce, industry, and population; Parliamentary democracy; Irish problems; relations with America, India, Europe, and the world.

 

*357. Recent Britain (3)
Social, cultural, economic, and political history of 20th century Britain. Governments and people; labor, party politics, and the welfare state; two world wars; problems with Ireland and Europe; the end of Empire; race relations; mass media and popular culture; contemporary developments.

 

362. Colonial Latin America (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Iberian preparation for overseas expansion, discovery and conquest in America, evolution of colonial institutions, dynamic 18th century developments, wars of independence.

 

364. The Latin American Nations (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Political, economic, social and intellectual evolution of Latin America in the 19th and 20th Centuries.

 

*366. Latin American History and Literature (3)
Latin American history through the novel and film; will integrate literature and the cinema with traditional historical materials in order to provide the student with a deeper understanding of the development of Hispanic America.

 

*369. American Jewish History (3)
Chronological and thematic approach to American Jewish history. Covers Sephardic, German, Eastern European, and recent Jewish immigration. Emphasis on experiences immigrants brought with them. Critical examination of assimilation, transformation of traditions, women, anti-Semitism, development of denominations, mobility, leadership of Diaspora.
Letter grade only (A-F).

 

370. Chicano History (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Chicanos in the settlement and development of the Southwest and in contemporary U.S. society; Chicano experience as a U.S. minority group; emerging civil rights movement of La Raza.
Letter grade only (A-F). Same course as CHLS 300. Not open for credit to students with credit in CHLS 300.

 

371. Religion in American History (3)
Surveys role of religion in the development of the United States, to the present; themes of Judeo-Christian heritage, proliferation of denominations, and emergence of new religions; relationship of religion to society and politics, including revivalism, ecumenicalism, and social action movements.

 

*372. United States: Colonial Period (3)
Discovery and settlement of the new world; European institutions in a new environment; development of colonial government, economy and social institutions; European dynastic rivalry and colonial America.

 

*373. United States: Age of Revolution (3)
Clash between British attempts to control and tax the colonies and colonial distaste for both; growth of an independent spirit; the American Revolution; problems of the new nation; the constitution.

 

*375. The United States Emerges as a Nation (3)
An analysis of the political, economic, social, and intellectual forces from the adoption of the constitution through the 1840s.

 

*376. United States: Civil War and Reconstruction (3)
Sectional rivalry, manifest destiny, mid-century divisive forces, Civil War and reconstruction.

 

377. The United States at War (3)
Address questions regarding how and why the United States goes to war. Do we go to war to protect ourselves, our image as a world power, for economic reasons or as the result of an insult to our "national image?

 

*378. United States History: 1877-1920 (3)
Development of the U.S. as an urban, industrial, multicultural society; progressive reform movements at the city, state, and national level; rise of U.S. as a world power; WWI.

 

*379. United States: Twenties, Depression, and World War II (3)
The conflict-ridden 1920s; the Depression years, and the beginnings of welfare democracy; the United States in World War II.

 

*380. United States Since 1945 (3)
The United States in the nuclear age: the development of the Cold War and its domestic ramifications, the "post-industrial" economy, the civil rights revolution, the rise of political dissent, the Watergate affair, the Reagan revolution, and after.

 

381. Asian American Women (3)
Reconstructs and examines Asian American women’s history and contemporary experiences. Assesses the complexities of intersecting social categories of oppression and Asian American women’s active pursuit of equality and dignity.
Same course as ASAM 381 and W/ST 381.

 

382B. Modern China (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of the GE foundation.
Chinese society from 17th century to 1949. Impact of imperialism, reform and revolutionary movements, background of Chinese communism.
Not open for credit to students with credit in HIST 482B. Same course as CHIN 382B.

 

383A. Japan to 1850 (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Japan from prehistory to the nineteenth century; emphasis on social and cultural developments, the evolution of political institutions, and the development of early modern society.

 

383B. Modern Japan (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Japan from 1850 to 1945; collapse of the Tokugawa bakufu and rise of the Meiji state; industrialization, social change, and protest; “Taisho democracy” and the Pacific War.

 

*384. Contemporary Japan (3)
Japan since 1945; impact of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; American occupation of Japan; Japan’s “economic miracle,” social change and social criticism in literature and film; Japan’s role in the contemporary world; conflict with the U.S.

 

*385. History of India (3)
Survey of the South Asian subcontinent from its historic roots, through the founding/consolidation of the Mughal Empire, to the beginnings of Western imperialism and establishment of the British Raj, ending with nationalism and the events in contemporary South Asia.

 

*386. History of Modern Southeast Asia: Colonial Era to the Vietnam War (3)
Survey of political and cultural history of modern Southeast Asia from 1800: Expansion of European influence, growth of nationalism and process of decolonization, and the post-WWII configuration of the area. Both mainland and insular Southeast Asia will be surveyed.

 

387. The Vietnam War in U.S. History (3)
Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation.
Examines the history of American involvement in Vietnam, the experience of Americans (and to some extent, Vietnamese) who fought the Second Indochina War (1954-1975), and the impact of the war on American Society.

 

388. Contemporary China (3)
China from 1949 to the present. The political, economic and cultural factors that shaped its continuity and change and the impact of its transformation on Greater China, including Hong Kong and Taiwan.

 

*391. The Making of Modern Africa, 1800-1939 (3)
Survey of sub-Saharan Africa from the early 19th through the mid-20th centuries. Examines the European conquest and the entrenchment of colonialism. Emphasis will be on how Africans perceived these processes, how they adjusted to them, and the continuing relevance of these experiences today.

 

*392. Contemporary Africa, 1940-Present (3)
Surveys history of African continent during transition from colonialism to national independence and post-colonialism. The current political, economic, social and intellectual trends of Africa will be considered in historical context. African actions and perspectives will be prioritized.

 

393. Jews of the Modern Middle East (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Explores history, culture, and transformations of important Jewish communities in Middle East. Examines effects of modernization and colonialism on these disparate communities, including phenomenon of Jewish colonization of other Jews and impact of exclusivist nationalisms on Jewish identities.

 

*394. Middle Eastern Women (3)
Prerequisities: Upper division status.
Explores a wide range of roles played by Middle Eastern women throughout history, seek to understand their multi-faceted thoughts and activities, and discuss the most important issues related to women and gender in Middle Eastern history.
Same as W/ST 394.

 

*396. Contemporary World History (3)
Prerequisite: HIST 211 or 131 or consent of undergraduate/graduate advisor.
World historical approach to the study of the twentieth century. Themes include: the changing global economy and environment; the advance and retreat of empires; colonialism and post-colonialism; contending ideologies; the intensification of globalization at the end of the century.

 

400I. History of Western Scientific Thought (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Introduction to the history of science for both scientists and non-scientists. Evolution of the scientists’ views of the means and ends of their own activities; the ways in which science is affected by and affects contemporary cultures.

 

401. History for Secondary Social Science Teachers (3)
Prerequisites: completed a majority of all coursework in the Social Science Subject Matter Program. Capstone course for students in Social Science Subject Matter Program.
Examination of World and American history to promote global perspective and deeper knowledge of historical content within California History-Social Science Framework and Standards, historiography and historical thinking, methodology related to teaching and learning history. Emphasis on imbedding interdisciplinary approaches from social sciences in teaching and learning of history.
A grade of “B” or better is required for advancement to student teaching. Letter grade only (A-F).

 

402. Oral History Methods (1)
Through a series of workshops and through field experience, skills in oral history will be developed which will enable students to use oral history either for their own personal use in family history or for class projects.
Credit/No Credit grading only. Same course as C/LA 485.

 

405./505. Classical Japan (3)
Japan from prehistory to the fifteenth century. Connections to other Asian cultures, the influence of Buddhism, and development of Japanese esthetics exemplified in literature and art; dynamics of centralized vs. regional power; civil vs. military authority.

 

*406A. Asian Women: East and Northeast Asia (3)
Prerequisite: Upper division status.
Exploration of the histories of women in China, Japan and Korea from prehistory to the present. Major themes include women's contributions to social, cultural and political change, and the complex relationship between feminism and nationalism in the modern period.
Same courses as A/ST 406A and W/ST 406A.

 

*406B. Asian Women: South and Southeast Asia (3)
Emphasis on modern period; exploration of complexities of women's roles in multicultural, multilingual societies in South and Southeast Asia, including gender as a continuing site of contention in nationalist discourse.
Same course as A/ST 406B and W/ST 406B. Letter grade only (A-F).

 

407I. Japan and the United States in the 20th Century (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Examination of relationships between Japan and the United States, emphasizing cultural, economic, and political conflict and cooperation.

 

409./509. Early Modern Japan (3)
Japan from the mid-16th century to the end of the Tokugawa period in 1868; reunification, the growth of urban centers and transportation, economic growth; blossoming of political theory, and of popular culture.

 

*410. Chinese Emigration/Migration in Modern Period (3)
Emphasis on Chinese in SE Asia, the Americas, and Western Europe; exploration of the implications of human migration for the developing world, and the fluidity and contested nature of "nation states."

 

416. Central Asia and Afghanistan from the Mongol Era to WWI (3)
Prerequisite: Upper-Division status.
An introductory survey of the history of change and continuity in Afghanistan and Turkistan (currently Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan) during the Mongol Era of the Thirteenth Century and the World War I.

 

418. Central Asia and Afghanistan, Twentieth Century (3)
Prerequisite: Upper-Division status.
An introductory survey of the history of change and continuity in Afghanistan and Turkistan (currently Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan) during the Twentieth Century.

 

428. History of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Examines evolution of Palestinian-Israeli conflict from late nineteenth century to present. Explores how social, economic, and political realities gave birth to competing Zionist and Palestinian national identities evolved over time, highlighting diverse perspectives within each national community, including those informed by gender and class.

 

431./531. The Middle East (Southwest Asia), 600-1700 (3)
Explores political, cultural, social, and economic developments in the region: emergence of Islam; creation and development of Islamic Empire; rise of dynastic successor states and “gunpowder” empires; European encroachment; and, integration into the emerging world system.

 

432./532. The Middle East (Southwest Asia), 1700-Present (3)
Explores political, cultural, social, and economic developments in the region: Modernization and reform; problems and impact of modernity and imperialism; state building; nationalism; and, Islamic revivalism.

 

435. History of the Francophone World (3)
Perequisites: HIST 132, 212, or approval of advisor.
Commencing with a study of the history of French language, explores methods by which France expanded its global presence. Themes to be covered include French colonialism, resistance to French overseas expansion and issues relative to race and identity.

 

*437. History of Germany 1871 to Present (3)
History of Germany from unification: the First World War, the Weimar Republic, the National Socialist Reich, and the post-war recovery.

 

441./541. Mediterranean World (3)
Prerequisite: HIST 211 or 131 or consent of undergraduate/graduate advisor
Focuses on pre-modern Mediterranean world up to geographical shift of political power and wealth to the Atlantic world with an emphasis on the exchange and interaction of peoples and ideas.
Letter grade only (A-F).

 

443./543. The Early Modern Atlantic World (3)
Prerequisite: HIST 211 or 132 or consent of undergraduate/graduate advisor
Examines early modern Atlantic from a world historical perspective with an emphasis on cultural encounter and exchange, environmental interaction, and comparative colonial development from early Iberian maritime expansion through the Atlantic revolutions and wars of independence.
Letter grade only (A-F).

 

450. Foucault and His Critics: Making A Social Body (3)
Examines Foucaultian texts and works of other theorists in historical context. Also explores the ways in which historians apply Foucault's theories to investigations of social and political reforms of Modern Europe, specifically the history of mass culture and citizenship.

 

*461. History of Precolumbian Mexico (3)
History of Meso-America from prehistoric times to the Spanish conquest, emphasizing the study of the societies and the religious and intellectual life of people of ancient middle America.

 

*462. Mexico (3)
Spanish conquest of Indian Mexico; settlement and exploration; colonial life and institutions; the achievement of independence from Spain; reform, foreign intervention, dictatorship in the 19th century; the Revolution of 1910 and after; contemporary Mexico.

 

*463. The Caribbean and Central America (3)
History of the Caribbean Islands and Central America from European colonization to the present, with emphasis on Cuba and Central America. Economic, political and cultural development and relations with the United States.

 

464. Latin American Environmental History (3)
Prerequisites: Three units upper-division Latin American history.
Explores the environmental history of Latin America, with a focus on the production of nature and society and the transformation of the relationship between human societies and the natural world from pre-European contact to the 21st century.

 

*466. Topics in Latin American History (3)
Selected topics in Latin American history. The topic will vary from one semester to the next.
May be repeated to a maximum of 9 units with different topics.

 

*467. Long Beach History (3)
Survey of the history of Long Beach, California, 1890 to the present. Emphasis on local and regional politics, economic development, international trade, and the complicated roles of ethnic and racial diversity in a city with both an urban, and suburban, history.

 

*469. Ethnic Groups in Urban America: An Historical Examination (3)
Examination of the origin, migration, settlement and the assimilation of various ethnic groups in American cities since the late 19th century. Emphasis will be on the economic, social, and political struggles encountered by different groups adjusting to urban life.

 

*471. History of the Westward Movement (3)
Examination of the impact of American expansion on the West: Euro-American exploration and migration, ethnic conflict and conquest, gender and family roles on the frontier, environmental changes in the West, development of economic institutions, and urbanization of the region.

 

*472. History of the South (3)
Explores development of the South, including examination of regional culture, traditions, and social crisis in the Antebellum period; conflict and social change; economic transformations; role of women in the region; and the interaction of racial groups in the Modern South.

 

*473. California History (3)
Survey of California from the 1500s to the present. Emphasis on migration, cultural diversity, and significant social, political, and economic developments.

 

474I. The History and Culture of American Cities (3)
Prerequisites: Completion of GE foundation requirements, one or more Explorations courses, and upper-division standing.
Interdisciplinary exploration of the history and cultural life of American cities from the nineteenth century to the present.

 

475. American Immigration and Ethnicity (3)
Explores the history of immigration to the United States and the experiences of immigrants in American society. Major themes include political, social, and economic implication of immigration; push and pull factors; nativism; assimilation; and social constructions of ethnicity.

 

476. The History of Social Activism (3)
Prerequisites: General Education Category A must be completed prior to taking any upper-division course.
Social movements are collective efforts to change society. At many times in history they have had dramatic consequences and they continue to be a focus of controversy, conflict, and change today.

 

477A./577A. American Cultural History (3)
Development of American way of life treated in terms of values, behavior and institution, themes of individualism, community, ethnic diversity and social reform.

 

477B./577B. American Cultural History (3)
Development of American way of life treated in terms of values, behavior and institutions, themes of individualism, community, ethnic diversity and social reform.

 

*478. Foreign Relations of the U.S. (3)
Incorporates a global perspective and considers the influence of such issues as domestic politics, bureaucratic rivalry and decision-making, economics, ideology, race, and the role of special interest groups in the making of foreign policy.
Same course as I/ST 478.

 

*479. U.S. Constitution: Origins and Early Development (3)
European sources of constitutional thought, colonial background, impact of the American Revolution, the framing period and the rise of a judicial approach to constitutional interpretation. Emphasis throughout: the evolution of constitutionalism as a basic principle in American thought and institutions.

 

*480. Law and Fundamental Rights in American History (3)
Selected variable topics on civil liberties issues addressing the historical development of constitutional guarantees in the areas of freedom of expression, privacy, church and state, due process, and equal protection.

 

*481. The Environmental History of Early America:1500-1860 (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100 and upper division status.
Explores environmental history, with a focus on how Native Americans, Europeans, Africans (and their descendants) defined relationships with the natural world and manipulated it according to economic needs and cultural values.

 

*482. Recent American Environmental History (3)
An examination of the impact of industrialization and urban growth on the American environment, the emergence of ecological consciousness and green politics, and the creation of the idea of Nature in American culture in the U.S. since the 1860s.

 

*483. Women in Eighteenth-Century England and America (3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 100 and upper division status.
Representations and realities of women's lives, 1688-1800, using critical methodology of history and literature; analysis of literary and historical texts to explore law and economics; religion; education and culture; marriage, sex, and health; politics and revolution.

 

485A. History of Women in the U.S. Early Period (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Survey of roles and activities of American women from colonial period to 1850, with focus on slavery, immigration, family, economy, law, and politics.
Only 3 units of 485A,B may be applied to a field of concentration in U.S. history for the major. Same course as W/ST 485A. Not open for credit to students with credit in W/ST 485A.

 

485B. History of Women in the U.S. Since 1850 (3)
Prerequisite: Completion of GE Foundation requirements.
Examines the changing roles and status of women’s economic, political, and social roles. It also explores the suffrage movement, the role played by women in WW II and the changes brought forth during the “second wave” of feminism.
Only 3 units of 485A,B may be applied to a field of concentration in U.S. history for the major. Same course as W/ST 485B.

 

*486. History of Afro-Americans in the United States (3)
Examines the roots and culture of Afro-Americans from African origins to the present. We will explore the transformation from slavery to freedom; segregation and racial conflict; emigration patterns, societal interactions, and the experiences of women.

 

*487. Film and Chinese History (3)
Exploration of the complex relationship between history and film in modern Chinese history.

 

*488. The Chinese Revolution (3)
Prerequisite: HIST 382B or consent of instructor.
Theory and practice of revolutionary socialism in the People’s Republic of China, historical and ideological background of the Chinese revolution, Mao and Maoism, politics, culture and society in China.
Same course as CHIN 488.

 

*489. Topics in Legal History of the United States (3)
Case studies in American law from colonial times to the present: English common law heritage, puritan and frontier influences, the legal profession, judicial traditions, formative stages in criminal law, torts and contracts, and modern trends in legal thought.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units with different topics.

 

490. Special Topics in History (1-3)
Topics of current interest in history selected for intensive development.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units with different topics in different semesters, but no more than 3 units may be used to satisfy the requirements for the major. Topics will be announced in the Schedule of Classes.
F. Women and War
Same topic as SPAN 493A and W/ST 490K.

 

*491. Modern and Contemporary Africa (3)
Conquest of Africa by European states, contrasting colonial systems as they evolved, anti-colonial movements and progress towards self-government or independence, problems of economic and political development, and race tensions in areas of white settlement.

 

492./592. Proseminar in World History (3)
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.
Discussion and analysis of recently published historical works and materials from a world history perspective.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units.

 

*494. Practicum in History (1-3)
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and department chair.
Field work in History, supplemented by reading and tutorials under direction of a faculty member. Internships, small group discussion/teaching, and other assignments directed by supervising faculty member.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units, but no more than 3 units may be applied to the major in History.

 

*495. Colloquium (3)
Prerequisites: HIST 301 and nine additional units of upper division History.
Seminar level course exploring a specific historical field or issue chosen by instructor; students expected to analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources in a paper presented to the class.
Part of core requirements for students declaring a major before summer 2001; students declaring a major after spring 2001 will be required to take HIST 499 as a core requirement, not 495.

 

*498. Directed Studies (1-3)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Independent study under the supervision of a faculty member.
May be repeated to a maximum 6 units.

 

498H. Honors Research (3)
Research for and writing of a senior thesis under the direction of a departmental advisor.

 

498O. Directed Studies in Oral History (1-6)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Directed study on a research topic using the methodology of oral history.
May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units. Same course as C/LA 498.

 

499. Senior Seminar (4)
Prerequisites: Completion of HIST 301, HIST 302, and 18 units of upper-division course work in History; at least two courses (six units) of which must be in the 499 seminar’s area of concentration.
Students must demonstrate mastery of historical processes and literature through: 1) portfolio submission; 2) research paper, and 3) oral presentations.
Not open for credit to students who have not met the prerequisites listed above. Letter grade only (A-F).