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California State University, Long Beach
Department of Family and Consumer Sciences
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CSUL Gerontology Student Research 2012

Student Facilitation of An Evidence Based Health Promotion Program

Lisa A. Lares

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the participant-rated effectiveness of the implementation of a Chronic Disease Self-Management Program by gerontology students. Specifically, this study investigated the effectiveness of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program when gerontology students versus peer community volunteers facilitated elderly clients in the workshop.  More specifically, the study attempted to understand the effectiveness of peer community volunteer-led versus gerontology student-led sessions by analyzing responses to four questions on a post-workshop survey (post-test) including participant opinions about the level at which facilitators were informative and caring, the usefulness of information to save participants visits to their physician, the amount of information learned and improvements in health. The sample for this study included 150 participants of a Chronic Disease Self-Management Program that was facilitated by a peer community volunteer or a gerontology student.  This study involved a secondary data analysis from a post-test given to the participants. Based on participant-rated effectiveness, peer community volunteers were rated as more effective than gerontology students in regards to teaching participants how to better manage their chronic illness.  Results also concluded that participants rated peer community volunteers as more informative and caring than gerontology students.  Recommendations for future research were discussed.

The effectiveness of Cane Fu as an intervention for reducing fall risk and fear of falling amongst the elderly

Brian Riseley

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of practicing ten hours of Cane Fu on fall risk and activity-specific balance confidence scores among individuals aged 55 and over. Eighteen participants were drawn from two locations. A causal-comparative prepost test design was used to compare participants' scores as observed before and after participating in 10 hours of Cane Fu classes. Fall risk was assessed using the Timed-Up-and-Go test and fear of falling was assessed using the Activity-Specific Balance Confidence Scale. Participants' fall risk scores were significantly lower following 10 hours of Cane Fu training. However, there was no significant difference in participants' Activity-Specific Balance Confidence Scores as observed before and after treatment. From this, it can be concluded that Cane Fu is an effective intervention for reducing fall risk among individuals aged 55 and over. These results may have been influenced by unpaired prepost tests.

 

 

Lares, Lisa

Lares A. Lisa, M.S.

B.A., B.S. California State University of Long Beach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brian Riesley, M.S.

Riesley, Brian, M.S.

B.S. California State University of Long Beach