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FIELD EVIDENCE TECHNICIAN COURSE

80 HOURS

I. CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION
A. Definitions
B. Classification of Physical Evidence
C. Preparing a Permanent Record
D. Processing the Crime Scene
E. Experiments, Exhibits and Demonstrations
F. Firearms - Distance Determination
G. Footwear

II. DEATH INVESTIGATION
A. Identification of the Body
B. General Classifications of Death
C. Identification Techniques Applicable with Intact Body
1. Personal Identification
2. Personal Effects Found on Body
3. Fingerprints
4. Dental Charts
5. Blood Type
6. X-ray
7. Hair
D. Methods of Identification of Skeletal and Badly
Decomposed Body
1. Determination of Sex
2. Age through Skeletal Examination
3. Height - Size
E. Evidence
F. Area of Discovery of Body
G. Catastrophe Identification
H. Examination of Body
I. Legal Medicine
J. Putrification
K. Injuries other than Shotgun
L. Gunshot Wounds
M. Autopsy

III. CRIME SCENE PHOTOGRAPHY
A. Technical Photography
B. Care and Maintenance of Equipment
C. Film
D. Exposure
E. Depth of Field
F. Perspective
G. Sharp Focus
H. Filters
I. Close-up Photography
J. Flash Photography
K. Purpose of Crime Scene Photography
L. Admissibility of Photographic Evidence

IV. PHOTOGRAPHIC SPECIFIC CRIME SCENES
A. Homicide
B. Suicide
C. Robberies
D. Burglaries
E. Explosions
F. Assaults
G. Arson
H. Traffic Accidents

V. PHOTOGRAPHIC EVIDENCE
A. Fingerprints
B. Impressions
C. Trace Evidence
D. Documents
E. Infrared Photography
F. Ultraviolet and Fluorescence Photography

VI. PHOTOGRAPHIC SURVEILLANCE

VII. TRIAL ASPECTS OF PHYSICAL EVIDENCE
A. Benefits of Physical Evidence at Trial
B. Typical Problems at the Crime Scene
C. Factors Requiring Completeness of Investigation
D. Basic Premise in Investigation
E. Chain of Custody of Physical Evidence
F. Preservation of Evidence Collected
G. Return of Evidence to Victim 1413 P.C.
H. Recent Significant Decisions
I. Talking to Reporters

J. Cases Decisions on Searches for Evidence
K. Legal Issues in Interrogation

VIII. FINGERPRINTS
A. Lifting Latent Prints from Human Skin
B. Fingerprint Classification Formulas
C. Methods of Recovery, Preservation and Primary Classification

IX. CASTS AND MOLDS
A. Introduction
B. Casting
1. Procedures
2. Materials
C. Molding
1. Moulage
2. Evaluation of Casts

X. CHEMICAL DEVELOPMENT
A. Factors Affecting Development
B. Methods of Development
C. Field Use of Chemical Accelerants
D. Development with Heat Acceleration
E. Development with Locite's Hard Evidence
F. Recovery and Preservation Techniques
G. Effects on Other Forms of Evidence
H. Safety Hazards

XI. TRACE EVIDENCE
A. Glass
B. Sample Collection
C. Comparison Standard
D. Size
E. Paint
F. Hair
G. Fibers
H. Soil

XII. BLOOD AND PHYSIOLOGICAL FLUIDS
A. Blood as Physical Evidence
B. Blood Stains
C. Dried Blood
D. Storage of Evidence
E. Comparison Standards for Blood Grouping Cases
F. Hidden Blood

G. Seminal Fluid
H. Saliva
I. Perspiration - Vaginal Exudate

XIII. BLOOD STAIN INTERPRETATION
A. Basics of Fluid Dynamics and the Nature of Blood
B. Determination of Distance Traveled
1. The Effect of Distance and Surface Determination
2. Class Experiment for Distance
C. Determination of Direction and Angle
1. Interaction of Angle and Determination
2. Class Experiment for Angle and Determination
D. Application of Principles of Fluid Dynamics to Crime
Scene Reconstruction
E. Experiments in Duplicating Crime Scene Patterns

XIV. PRACTICUM
A. Class members assigned to teams
B. Teams assigned to specific crime scene
C. Teams gather evidence
D. Present findings to D.A. & Criminalist (Final Exam)

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