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California State University, Long Beach
Counseling & Psychological Services
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APA Doctoral Internship

  • Accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA)
  • Member of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC)
  • Member of the Association of Counseling Center Training Agencies
  • National Matching Service #112711
  • This doctoral internship in professional psychology is currently accredited by the Commission on Accreditation, American Psychological Association, 750 First Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002-4242. Phone: (202) 336-5979

Table of Contents

Counseling and Psychological Services

CAPS is a department within the Division of Student Services at California State University, Long Beach. CAPS offers several programs designed to help students identify and accomplish their academic and career goals, enhance personal development, meet life’s challenges and improve interpersonal relationships. CAPS is established as a comprehensive counseling center offering core clinical services, developmental and life skills interventions, consultation, and outreach to a diverse student population. Short-term counseling and psychotherapy are the primary means of direct service delivery. Several general therapy, theme-oriented, and structured groups are offered each semester. Life skills workshops with a developmental focus are offered. Crisis intervention is also available.

Several types of consultation services are offered to faculty, staff, administration, and student groups. Clinical and program consultation are provided as well as training of professional and student staff. In collaboration with academic departments and student services offices, outreach programs are developed to assist special populations and students with specific needs. In all services, consideration is shown for diverse backgrounds, value systems and lifestyles.

CAPS staff represents and favors a variety of theoretical positions including psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, feminist, interpersonal, existential, humanistic, and systems perspectives. Generally, an integrated approach to counseling and psychotherapy is shared by the staff.

California State University, Long Beach

California State University, Long Beach is a large, urban, comprehensive university in the California State University (CSU) system. The Long Beach campus was founded in 1949. Its mission is high quality education leading toward a broad range of baccalaureate and graduate degrees spanning the liberal arts and sciences and many applied and professional fields. The 322 acre campus includes 80 permanent buildings that house the various colleges, 63 academic departments, 11 centers, 3 institutes and 3 clinics. Campus features include KKJZ, FM-88, one of the nation’s premier public radio and jazz stations; the 18- story Pyramid sports arena; the Earl Burns Miller Japanese Gardens; University Art Museum; and the Richard and Karen Carpenter Center for Performing Arts. Specialized facilities for engineering technology, microbiology, dance, music and nursing are provided, along with the International House student residence hall and meeting complex. The landscape design features 3,200 flowering peach trees donated by the citizens of Long Beach.

Current enrollment is approximately 35,000 students with no ethnic or racial group comprising a majority. The core of the student body consists of full-time, traditional-aged daytime students. To assure access and equity, the university endeavors to serve students who can attend only in the evening hours, those who must attend part-time, and those from population groups whose rates of enrollment historically have been lower than average.

The university is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. It is accredited by the California State Board of Education and is on the list of approved institutions of the American Association of University Women. The University has been designated as an Hispanic Serving Institute.

CSULB admits students of any race, religion, age, color, creed, gender, handicap, sexual orientation, or national or ethnic origin to all rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at CSULB. CSULB does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, age, color, creed, gender, handicap, sexual orientation, or national or ethnic origin in the administration of its educational policies, admission policies, employment policies, or any other programs administered by the University.

In addition to meeting fully its obligations of nondiscrimination under federal and state law, CSULB is committed to creating a community in which a diverse population can live and work in an atmosphere of tolerance, civility and respect for the rights and sensibilities of each individual, without regard to economic status, ethnic background, political views, sexual orientation or other personal characteristics or beliefs.

City of Long Beach, California

Long Beach, known as the "International City," offers the advantages of a metropolitan area and the comfort and ease of a suburban beach town. Its mild climate means the outdoors may be enjoyed year round. Located in Los Angeles County, Long Beach has a population of more than 450,000 people. The city is truly culturally diverse with no ethnic or racial group comprising a majority, and with a significant and active LGBT population. You will recognize Long Beach sites in many feature films and television shows. The city, located on the pacific coast, is within easy driving distance to mountains and deserts. Cultural, educational, and recreational opportunities are virtually unlimited.

Philosophy and Model of Training

The program follows a practitioner-scholar training model. The internship is both training and service oriented. Interns are considered to be developing professional psychologists and are treated as colleagues. While preparing interns for multifaceted careers, the internship provides a unique preparation for those aiming for careers in university counseling centers. The goal of the training program is to support continued development in clinical and consultation skills, ethical principles, and professional identity. A multicultural and diversity focus is thematic throughout the internship program. Ongoing development of one's personal and cross-cultural awareness, knowledge and skills is emphasized.

Interns are expected to participate in all areas of service delivery and supervision. Opportunities exist to develop or expand upon special interests. Along with staff psychologists, interns study, discuss, and apply psychological theory, principles, and findings. Interns completing the program successfully will be competent for the entry level of practice. They will have demonstrated the capability to function autonomously and responsibly as practicing psychologists.

Goals, Objectives, and Competencies

The internship has established the following goals, objectives, and competencies:

Goal 1:

Develop competency in individual counseling and psychotherapy.

Objectives: 1) knows and understands theoretical and empirically based foundations and independently applies this knowledge to practice; 2) demonstrates awareness of individual strengths and areas in need of improvement in the context of therapeutic practice; 3) recognizes limitations of competence and facilitates consultation and referral; 4) develops knowledge, skills, and practices with sensitivity to clients within their cultural contexts; 5) independently and confidently integrates ethical standards and legal regulations with all foundational and functional competencies.

Expected Competencies: 1) consistently informs practice with relevant theory, research, and clinical experience, as appropriate; 2) understands and applies a life-span developmental perspective; 3) develops and applies an integrative psychotherapeutic approach; 4) understands and applies a brief therapy model; 5) understands and applies empirically supported treatments; 6) applies knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding intersecting and complex dimensions of diversity to practice; 7) reliably identifies complex ethical and legal issues, analyzes them accurately, and proactively addresses them.

Goal 2:

Develop competency in the theory and practice of group counseling.

Objectives: 1) knowledge of theories used in group therapy; 2) understanding of group process and intervention strategies; 3) ethical principles in group therapy; 4) independently and confidently interacts ethical/legal standards with all foundational and functional competencies; 5) develop knowledge,skills, and practices with sensitivity to clients within their cultural contexts.

Expected Competencies: 1) ability to assess the need for a group, recruit members, screen members, observe process, co-lead and lead group; 2) ability to independently and effectively implement a range of intervention strategies appropriate to group therapy; 3) reliably indentifies complex ethical and legal issues, analyzes them accurately and proactively addresses them; 4) consistently informs practice with relevant theory, research, and clinical experience, as appropriate.

Goal 3:

Develop competency in crisis intervention.

Objectives: 1) understanding of crisis intervention models; 2) adhere to ethical principles and legal mandates; 3) independently and confidently integrates ethical/legal standards with all foundational and functional competencies; 4) develop knowledge, skills, and practices with sensitivity to clients within their cultural contexts.

Expected Competencies: 1) application of a specific crisis intervention model; 2) ability to effectively consult and refer in response to a crisis; 3) assess immediacy and severity of presenting problem; 4) reliably identifies complex ethical and legal issues, analyzes them accurately, and proactively addresses them; 5) consistently informs practice with relevant theory, research, and clinical experience, as appropriate.

Goal 4:

Develop competency in clinical assessment and differential diagnosis.

Objectives: 1) ability to formulate a case conceptualization using a clear theoretical framework; 2) competence in formulating a treatment plan based on clinical assessment; 3) competence in and sensitivity to diversity and developmental issues in clinical assessment; 4) develops knowledge, skills, and practices with sensitivity to clients within their cultural contexts; 5) independently and confidently integrates ethical/legal standards policy with all foundational and functional competencies.

Expected Competencies: 1) ability to use clinical interview to determine differential diagnoses for clients: 2) ability to utilize DSM-IV diagnostic classification system for mental disorders, using all five axes; 3) ability to formulate treatment plan based on conceptualization and diagnoses; 4) independent ability to address complex individual and cultural diversity issues as they inform all foundational and functional competencies; 5) reliably identifies complex ethical and legal issues, analyzes them accurately, and proactively addresses them; 6) consistently informs practice with relevant theory, research, and clinical experience, as appropriate.

Goal 5:

Develop competency in providing counseling and consulting services to diverse individuals and groups.

Objectives: 1) develop knowledge, skills, and practices attuned to the unique worldview of clients by incorporating an understanding of their diverse background into therapy (e.g., ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, disabilities, religion/spiritual, SES); 2) understanding of within-group differences; 3) obtain a solid awareness of own cultural identity and background; 4) ability to engage in dialogue and explore how values, beliefs, and biases impact perception of the client, the client's experience, and the therapeutic process; 5) independently and confidently integrates ethical/legal standards and policies with all foundational and functional competencies; 6) develop knowledge, skills, and practices with sensitivity to clients within their cultural contexts.

Expected Competencies: 1) focus on clients within their cultural contexts; the ability to elicit relevant information; have a broad repertoire of interventions; and utilize appropriate assessment tools; 2) articulates an integrative conceptualization of diversity as it impacts clients, self, and others; 3) seeks consultation addressing individual and cultural diversity when appropriate; 4) reliably identifies complex ethical and legal issues, analyzes them accurately, and proactively addresses them; 5) consistently informs practice with relevant theory, research, and clinical experience, as appropriate.

Goal 6:

Develop competency in providing campus outreach.

Objectives: 1) knowledge of community psychology model to provide primary and mental health prevention services to students through outreach activities in a university setting; 2) demonstrates knowledge and skills in providing systemic interventions through consultation projects; 3) independently and confidently integrates ethical/legal standards and policies with all foundational and functional competencies; 4) develops knowledge, skills, and practices with sensitivity to clients within their cultural contexts; 5) consistently informs practice with relevant theory, research, and clinical experience, as appropriate.

Expected Competencies: 1) identifies and targets specific populations for outreach; 2) identifies appropriate prevention strategy for specific interventions/populations; 3) designs outreach activities appropriate for targeted populations; 4) develops skills in group facilitation, delivery, and evaluation of workshop presentations; 5) assesses the consultation needs of groups or organizations; 6) processes and designs consultation interventions with campus units; 7) evaluate consultation interventions.

Goal 7:

Professional Identity Development.

Objectives: 1) experiences significant consolidation of professional identity as a psychologist; 2) acquires knowledge about issues central to the field; 3) adopts a practitioner-scholar model of practice; 4) develops and maintains effective relationships with a wide range of clients, colleagues, organizations, and communities; 5) possesses advanced interpersonal skills and demonstrates respect for others; 6) clearly understands professional boundaries; 7) independently and confidently integrates ethical/legal standards with all foundational and functional competencies; 8) develops knowledge, skills, and practices with sensitivity to clients within their cultural contexts.

Expected Competencies: 1) maintain awareness of current issues and developments in profession; 2) attends professional meetings; 3) demonstrates ability to collaborate with counseling center psychologists and within an interdisciplinary team; 4) capacity to relate respectfully and effectively with individuals, groups, and communities; 5) demonstrates a clear understanding of professional boundaries, appreciates individual and group differences, and respects self and others; 6) establishes mentoring relationships within academic departments, counseling center, and or professional organizations; 7) consistently informs practice with relevant theory, research, and clinical experience, as appropriate; 8) manages difficult communication.

Core Curriculum

Counseling and Psychotherapy

Short-term counseling and psychotherapy are the primary means of direct service delivery. Interns can expect significant experience and supervision in individual short-term counseling. A limited number of clients may be seen long-term; interns may expect to follow two cases for the full year. Interns will be scheduled for crisis coverage on a weekly basis, with supervision and consultation readily available. Interns conduct intake interviews on a weekly basis. Along with behavioral observation and structured clinical interviews, interns utilize standard diagnostic systems such as the DSM-IV in client conceptualization and treatment planning.

Group Counseling

A special component of the internship is training and practice in group counseling. CAPS maintains an active group program each semester. The groups offered may be process oriented or structured, general therapy or theme based, for the general population or for special populations. Typically, interns co-lead one group each semester.

Outreach

Training in outreach services is emphasized. Training in the various forms of consultation is provided. Among those who make use of the consultation services are academic support and student services as well as faculty and staff. Outreach programs seek to promote positive student development in a variety of settings. Staff and interns are also available to provide requested workshops, training seminars, and didactic presentations. Psychological debriefing sessions are offered following a traumatic event. Interns may participate in the development of new outreach programs as well as in continuing programs. Each intern will be assigned to a formal liaison relationship with a campus program or organization. The internship offers an opportunity to design and facilitate psychoeducational groups. Outreach programs and consultation projects are developed and implemented with senior staff.

Diversity Training

Located in Los Angeles County, California State University, Long Beach offers an extremely diverse student population. The development of competence in the provision of counseling and consulting services to diverse individuals and groups is emphasized. Interns are expected to actively seek out experiences of diversity with students, clients, and colleagues. The training focus is based on the premise that awareness of one’s own values, assumptions, and behaviors is necessary in order to develop into a competent clinician. Interns participate in a weekly diversity training seminar that is both didactic and experiential in nature. Multiculturalism is infused within clinical supervision, training seminars, counseling, and outreach.

Diversity Training Opportunities: There are a range of diversity training opportunities at CSU Long Beach. We have a highly diverse staff that is involved with clinical, community, and professional activities that reflect our commitment to multicultural issues. We expect intern involvement in these activities and support interns in their areas of interest. Examples of diversity training opportunities that interns have been involved with include:

  • Human Relations Summit
  • Latina Connections Conference
  • Sisterfriends African American Women's Support Group
  • Asian American Women's Support Group
  • Asian American Drug Abuse Program (AADAP)
  • Educational Equity Programs
  • LGBT Resource Center
  • Women's Resource Center
  • Women's Studies Program
  • Center for International Education
  • International Student Association
  • University Interfaith Center
  • Latinas at the Beach
  • Latinos at the Beach
  • Mi Casa Mi Universidad Office

Supervision and Training

Intensive direct supervision in individual and group counseling is a significant component of the training program. Training includes video supervision. Personal exploration and awareness is valued and encouraged while personal boundaries are respected. Interns receive supervision individually for two hours and as a group for two hours on a weekly basis. Assigned individual supervisors are changed at the end of each semester so that the intern is exposed to more than one perspective and supervisory style. Individual supervision is provided by licensed counseling and clinical psychologists. Supervision for the intern group is the responsibility of the Training Director. Case consultation also occurs on a weekly basis during Case Conference Meetings with staff psychologists. Two special bi-weekly seminars focus on diversity training and outreach / consultation. Training modules topics include brief therapy; group counseling; professional issues; psychotherapy integration; and clinical supervision.

Research and Professional Development

The purpose of the internship year is to maximize the progress of the interns toward their professional goals. Time may be available during semester break, spring break, and summer session for completion of dissertation or other research projects. Interns are encouraged to participate in local and national training workshops and conferences, and professional associations. Professional release time is granted and limited financial support is provided when funds are available.

Typical Weekly Schedule

Direct Services
No. of Hours
Intake Interviews
3
Crisis Intervention
2
Individual / Couples
12
Group
2
Outreach
4
Subtotal
23
Training
No. of Hours
Individual Supervision
2
Group Supervision
2
Case Conference Meetings
2
Training Modules
2
Diversity Training
2
Outreach Training
1
Subtotal
11
Administration
No. of Hours
Case Management
5
Staff Meeting
1
Subtotal
6


GRAND TOTAL
40 Hours

Intern Evaluations and Requirements for Completion

The Training Director coordinates the training program and reviews the progress of the interns throughout the year. At the start of the year, the Training Director reviews the opportunities available and the amount of time to be devoted to core responsibilities and to individually tailored service and training activities. Interns meet weekly with the Training Director to discuss general and specific training issues. These discussions enable the Training Director to maintain awareness of the progress and problems confronted by the intern and to process developmental tasks and issues of the intern. The Training Director will provide guidance for interns dealing with specific problems or staff conflicts, and will intervene directly when necessary.

In the context of the supervisory relationships with the primary clinical supervisor and Training Director, the intern receives ongoing feedback regarding professional strengths and areas in need of improvement, particularly in the area of counseling and psychotherapy. The Training Committee, clinical supervisors, seminar leaders, and group co-leaders meet each month to review the progress of all interns. At mid-semester the primary clinical supervisor provides informal, verbal feedback to the intern regarding progress and goals. A written evaluation and formal meeting will be scheduled if problems that require a remedial plan are identified. At the end of each semester, the clinical supervisor provides a comprehensive, written formal evaluation of the intern. The intern meets with the supervisor and Training Director to review these evaluations. Perceptual or factual differences between these evaluations are expected to be resolved during this meeting. Each training seminar leader provides a brief, written evaluation of the progress of the intern at the end of each semester.

Following the meeting with the intern and the clinical supervisor, the Training Director integrates the evaluations of the intern and meets with the intern to provide a summary evaluation which is forwarded to the academic program. The intern is provided the opportunity to review progress and negotiate new training goals. The intern is given the opportunity to provide input and suggest changes and modifications to the program. Identified concerns and suggestions may be taken to the Training Committee, the staff, or the intern group by the Training Director.

Generally, intern competence is measured by direct observation of their work; collaboration in outreach and consultation projects; co-therapy with staff psychologists; structured and narrative ratings of clinical performance; written client feedback; case presentations; intake, termination, and crisis reports; progress notes; and written summaries of experiences. Completion of training experiences and outcome criteria in all areas of the core curriculum is monitored using a checklist.

Statement Regarding Outside Employment

Because of the intensity of the internship year, we discourage interns from seeking or maintaining outside employment. If an intern chooses to work outside of the internship, we have the following requirements:

Outside employment may not interfere with the intern's ability to perform required duties. Outside employment may not conflict with the requirements and schedule of the training program. CAPS maintains an 8-5 schedule, Monday through Friday, with flexible hours for after-hours groups or consultations. The internship requires a 40 hour-per-week time commitment. Interns are expected to make significant progress toward the completion of their dissertation during the training year.

Resources

The interns have administrative assistants available to them for scheduling, mailings, flyer design, and assistanace with personnel procedures. Opportunities for co-programming with staff from other student services offices are available. Consultation with an in-house psychiatrist and case manager is available.

Each intern occupies a well-appointed individual office that includes a PC with the Windows environment. They have access to campus email and the internet. Digital recorders are provided to each intern. A small training library includes DVDs and current books on the subjects of psychotherapy and consultation.

Stipend and Benefits

Currently the stipend for this 12-month internship is $26,000. Comprehensive benefits include a health plan (including vision and dental); vacation, professional and sick leave; access to the university library; and a limited travel allowance when funds are available. Health plan benefits are available to spouses, dependents, and to domestic partners registered with the State.

Selection Procedure


Selection Process

Interns are selected on a competitive basis from a nationwide pool of applicants and are from both universities and professional schools of psychology. Applications are reviewed and structured telephone interviews are conducted by the Selection Committee. The Selection Committee is chaired by the Training Director.

Applicants must have permission to work in the United States. Applicants must have permission to work for the entire length of the 12-month, full-time internship period.

Selection Criteria

ACADEMIC

  • The applicant is a doctoral candidate in counseling or clinical psychology at a regionally accredited university or school of professional psychology.
  • The candidate is from an APA accredited program.
  • The applicant must have completed all courses and practica.
  • The applicant will have completed and passed comprehensive examinations by rank day.
  • The applicant is from an academic program that offers training in life-span development, community psychology, multicultural counseling and group process that is directly applicable to work in a comprehensive counseling center serving an urban university community that places value on all forms of diversity.
  • The training of the applicant complies with current ethics and standards of practice of the American Psychological Association.

INTEREST

  • The applicant should have a strong desire to examine attitudes, assumptions, behaviors, and values in order to learn to work effectively with all forms of diversity.
  • The applicant expresses interest in gaining breadth of knowledge and experience.
  • The applicant has expressed an interest in generalist training and career goals.
  • The applicant expresses comparable goals and interests to what is offered at this training facility.
  • The applicant expresses genuine interest in college students, i.e., an appreciation for and knowledge of the developmental concerns of this population.
  • The applicant expresses interest and openness to the training experience this site has to offer.

EXPERIENCE

  • The applicant has practice experience with outpatient adults and/or adolescents with a range of symptoms.
  • The applicant has completed a minimum of 500 direct clinical service hours.
  • The applicant has some psychological assessment experience.
  • The applicant already possesses knowledge, skills, and interests that will meet some of the current needs of CAPS and its clientele in terms of clinical, outreach, and consultation services.
  • Previous experience in a university counseling center is desirable but not required.

INTERPERSONAL

  • The applicant has demonstrated higher-level interpersonal skills as described by reference letters and exhibited during the interview.
  • It is predicted that the applicant will demonstrate interpersonal fit and comfort with the current staff.

Selection Schedule

Refer to the APPIC Directory for the date that application materials are due and the interview notification date. Interviews occur in late January.

Application Procedure

Dear Internship Applicant:

I offer you my congratulations for your academic and professional accomplishments as you now prepare for internship. I am very pleased that you are considering our internship and hope that you decide to apply to our APA accredited training program. I hope that our web site provides you with useful information about our internship, university, and city.

We participate in the APPIC Internship Matching Program. Our program code number for matching is 112711. You must obtain an Applicant Agreement Package from National Matching Services and register for the Matching Program in order to be eligible for our internship. This internship site agrees to abide by the APPIC Policy that no person at this training facility will solicit, accept, or use any ranking-related information from any intern applicant.

We schedule visits to campus and the center only for those candidates who have been offered an interview. Interns and training staff may be available to meet with you during your visit, depending on our schedules. Please call us to let us know when you plan to visit. A campus visit is not a requirement for selection and will have no influence on the selection process. All interviews will be conducted by telephone. We follow the APPIC Schedule and Match Policies. You will find a list of required application materials below.

Sincerely,

Diane Hayashino, Ph.D.
Training Director
Program Code #112711
E-mail: Diane.Hayashino@csulb.edu

Required Application Materials

AAPI (APPIC) Online Application includes:
  • Cover Letter
  • Graduate Transcript
  • Curriculum Vita
  • 3 Letters of Reference (three references familiar with your graduate work, at least one of whom has been your clinical supervisor)

Note: All application materials are submitted online through APPIC. A CSULB application, graduate transcript, and other personnel forms will be required for interns matched with our site. Because of the nature of this position, the University requires that interns matched with this site successfully complete a felony conviction records check prior to assuming the position. We will make these arrangements for you on our campus.

Directions to California State University, Long Beach


Directions to Campus and Maps of Campus

Current and Former Interns

Year
Interns
Graduate
Institution
Degree
Program
Specialization First Position
(post-internship)
2014-2015
1
Fuller Theological Seminary Psy.D. Clinical University Counseling Center
2014-2015
2
Fuller Theological Seminary Psy.D. Clinical University Counseling Center
2014-2015
3
Fuller Theological Seminary Psy.D. Clinical University Counseling Center
2013-2014
1
Fuller Theological Seminary Psy.D. Clinical  
2013-2014
2
Pacific Graduate School of Psychology - Stanford Psy.D. Consortium Psy.D. Clinical University Counseling Center
2013-2014
3
Chicago School of Professional Psychology Psy.D. Clinical University Counseling Center
2012-2013
1
Pepperdine University Psy.D. Clinical University Counseling Center
2012-2013
2
University at Albany, SUNY Ph.D. Counseling University Counseling Center
2012-2013
3
Arizona State University Ph.D. Counseling Dissertation
2011-2012
1
Washington State University - Pullman Ph.D. Counseling Medical Center
2011-2012
2
University at Albany, SUNY Ph.D. Counseling University Counseling Center
2011-2012
3
University of California, Santa Barbara Ph.D. Counseling/ Clinical/ School Psychology University Counseling Center
2010-2011
1
Pacific Graduate School of Psychology - Stanford Psy.D. Consortium Psy.D. Clinical University Counseling Center
2010-2011
2
Idaho State University Ph.D. Clinical University Counseling Center
2010-2011
3
The Wright Institute Psy.D. Clinical Dissertation
2009-2010
1
The Chicago School of Professional Psychology Psy.D. Clinical Community Mental Health
2009-2010
2
Pacific Graduate School of Psychology - Stanford University Psy.D. Clinical University Counseling Center  
2009-2010
3
Alliant International University - CSPP San Francisco Ph.D. Clinical University Counseing Center  
2008-2009
1
So. Illinois University, Carbondale Ph.D. Counseling Dissertation
2008-2009
2
The Chicago School of Professional Psychology Psy.D. Clinical University Counseling Center
2008-2009
3
University at Albany, State University of New York Ph.D. Counseling University Counseling Center
2007-2008
1
Ohio University Ph.D. Clinical Psychology Department
2007-2008
2
University of Nebraska Ph.D. Counseling University Counseling Center
2007-2008
3
University of Denver Psy.D. Clinical Medical Center
2006-2007
1
University of Notre Dame Ph.D. Counseling University Counseling Center
2006-2007
2

Pepperdine

University

Psy.D. Clinical University Counseling Center
2006-2007
3
Ohio State University Ph.D. Counseling University Counseling Center
2005-2006
1
University of California, Santa Barbara Ph.D. Counseling University Counseling Center
2005-2006
2
University of Oklahoma Ph.D. Counseling Dissertation
2005-2006
3
University of Denver Psy.D. Clinical University Counseling Center
2004-2005
1
University of Southern California Ph.D. Counseling Community Mental Health
2004-2005
2
University of Minnesota Ph.D. Counseling College of Education and Human Development
2004-2005
3
Standford University Ph.D. Counseling College of Education
2003-2004
1
Fordham University Ph.D. Counseling Community Mental Health

2003-2004

2

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Psy.D.

Clinical

University Counseling Center

2003-2004

3

Fuller Theological Seminary

Ph.D.

Clinical

Community Mental Health

2002-2003

1

Alliant International University

Ph.D.

Clinical

University Counseling Center

2002-2003

2

Azusa Pacific University

Psy.D.

Clinical

University Counseling Center

2002-2003

3

George Mason University

Ph.D.

Clinical

Psychology Department

2001-2002

1

University of Southern California

Ph.D.

Counseling

Medical Center

2001-2002

2

Indiana University

Ph.D.

Counseling

Student

2000-2001

1

Loma Linda University

Psy.D.

Clinical

University Counseling Center

2000-2001

2

University of Southern California

Ph.D.

Counseling

University Counseling Center

2000-2001

3

Arizona State University

Ph.D.

Counseling

University Counseling Center

1999-2000

1

CSPP-LA

Ph.D.

Clinical

University Counseling Center

1999-2000

2

Arizona State University

Ph.D.

Counseling

Private Practice

1999-2000

3

Loma Linda University

Ph.D.

Clinical

Private Practice

1998-1999

1

Biola University

Psy.D.

Clinical

Community Mental Health

1998-1999

2

University of Southern California

Ph.D.

Counseling

University Administration

1998-1999

3

CSPP-Fresno

Ph.D.

Clinical

University Counseling Center

1997-1998

1

University of Southern California

Ph.D.

Counseling

Community Mental Health

1997-1998

2

Pepperdine University

Psy.D.

Clinical

Hospital/Private Practice

1997-1998

3

Biola University

Psy.D.

Clinical

University/School

1991-1992

1

Biola University

Psy.D.

Clinical

Group Practice

1991-1992

2

University Michigan

Ph.D.

Counseling

1990-1991

1

Biola University

Psy.D

Clinical

Group Practice

1990-1991

2

Ohio State University

Ph.D.

Counseling

Psychology Department

1990-1991

3

CSPP-LA

Ph.D.

Clinical

Private Practice

1989-1990

1

Oklahoma State

Ph.D.

Counseling

University Counseling Center

1989-1990

2

University Missouri

Ph.D.

Counseling

University Counseling

1989-1990

3

CSPP-Fresno

Ph.D.

Clinical

Community Mental Health

1988-1989

1

University of Southern California

Ph.D.

Counseling

Community College

1988-1989

2

Biola University

Psy.D.

Clinical

Community Mental Health

1988-1989

3

Ohio State University

Ph.D.

Counseling

University Counseling Center

1987-1988

1

Yeshiva University

Psy.D.

Clinical

Community Mental Health

1987-1988

2

University of Georgia

Ph.D.

Counseling

University Counseling Center

1987-1988

3

USIU

Psy.D.

Clinical

Private Practice

1986-1987

1

CSPP-LA

Ph.D.

Clinical

Private Practice

1986-1987

2

Indiana University

Ed.D.

Counseling

University Counseling Center

1985-1986

1

University of Mississippi

Ph.D.

Counseling

Medical Center

1985-1986

2

Ph.D.

Clinical

Community Mental Health


We are an American Psychological Association (APA) Accredited Doctoral Internship Training site.